Business & ICT

Directors of Learning design sequences of lessons that combine with our Personal Development Programme delivered by Form Tutors. These closely align with our mission to ‘Teach What Matters’, a deliberate approach to ensure we address challenges that our students are likely to face and to give them the best possible chance of meeting their limitless potential. 

We want all Holyhead students to be able to;

  • Solve problems
  • Apply knowledge to the real world
  • Adapt to change and be resilient to failure
  • Be aware of their own thought processes and memory (metacognition)
  • Be articulate and express themselves
  • Think critically

We want all students at Holyhead to be strong in relation to the following attributes;

  • Leadership
  • Organisation
  • Resilience
  • Initiative
  • Communication

We also want them to recognise the best of human thinking and appreciate the fundamental British Values.  

Mr B Maguire

Director of Learning for Business & ICT

Mrs H Sehra

Assistant Director of Learning for Business & ICT

Mrs T Wilson

Director of ITT for Business & ICT

Mrs S Dubb

Subject Leader for Computing

Our curriculum is more than the qualifications that students leave with, it’s about real-life experiences and opportunities. We hope to give our students skills that they can apply in school at home and in the future when they are either undertaking further study or entering the workplace.

We know that Handsworth matters and what it means to live in a place that is home to people from every corner of the world. We believe there are no limits to our ability to learn from each other. Our students are ambitious, enterprising and innovative, quick to see an economic opportunity – this is only matched by teachers who inspire intellectual curiosity and provide the skills and knowledge needed for students to understand what it means to be an entrepreneur, an accountant, a legal professional or a software engineer. The knowledge that we acquire must enable us to take an active part in society, take risks and learn from our mistakes and continually develop as people/entrepreneurs/citizens.

Our Faculty aims and intentions are simple.  We are a Faculty that delivers relevant subjects to our students focused on giving them the knowledge and skills that will enable them to go into the workplace with a clear career pathway.  We deliver subjects that enable students to progress into multiple different careers in areas such as Business, IT, Accountancy and Law, be that straight from school at 16 years old or to gain entry to higher education through reading at university or any gaining employment on relevant apprenticeship programmes up to and including Degree apprenticeships from 18 years old.  We deliver what matters to facilitate student/parent aspirations and contribute to making every one of our students a well rounded economic citizen.

Computing is a discipline that is rewarding and challenging; it requires and develops capabilities in solving complex, challenging problems (computational thinking). Pupils learn to design and evaluate computational solutions (programming) that model the state and behaviour of real-world systems By the end of Year 7 the pupils will understand and be prepared for the dangers linked with being online. They will experience different pieces of software that introduce them to the world of computer programming and will be able to develop skills in Using computers safely, effectively & responsibly; understanding computers; manipulating/creating spreadsheets, and health & safety. The students will also be able to access and use Google software and be able to switch between Google and Microsoft applications. In Year 8 the students will be able to program using a real programming language (Python), design and create a movie using  Movie Maker and they will also be able to edit sound. In Year 9 the students will be creating apps & exploring Augmented Reality. The theme of Legal, Environmental & Ethical issues will flow throughout Years 7, 8 & 9.

The Key skills for a Business & IT student

Business students need to demonstrate relevant and comprehensive knowledge and understanding of a wide range of business terms, concepts, theories, methods and models making good use of the business context. In reports they must provide logical, developed chains of reasoning, so that cause(s) and/or consequence(s)/effect(s) are complete and make well-informed judgements or propose solutions to business issues that weigh up arguments effectively and use quantitative and qualitative information,  addressing the demands of the question as a whole.

Computing is a discipline that is rewarding and challenging; it requires and develops capabilities in solving complex, challenging problems (computational thinking). Pupils learn to design and evaluate computational solutions (programming) that model the state and behaviour of real-world systems. Computer science students need to demonstrate extensive knowledge and understanding of the principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation and effectively and consistently apply knowledge and understanding of the principles and concepts of computer science.  They will effectively analyse problems in computational terms, and design, program and evaluate effective computer systems that solve substantial problems and demonstrate detailed and reasoned judgements when designing, programming and evaluating substantial problems

Accounting students need to demonstrate robust knowledge and understanding of a range of accounting principles, concepts and techniques from across the specification. Apply accounting principles, concepts and techniques with robust accuracy, using recognised formats and layouts. Demonstrate a robust ability to evaluate complex accounting data, making judgements and drawing sound and logical conclusions. 

Law students need to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of legal institutions, rules, principles, theory and concepts with clarity and accuracy, supported by perceptive identification and use of legal authority and other relevant evidence. They then need to apply legal rules and principles convincingly in a sustained, clear and logical manner, employing accurate and pertinent legal terminology, to suggest a solution and, where appropriate, alternative possible solutions, to resolve issues of legal liability.  Finally they need to analyse and evaluate legal rules, principles, theory, concepts and issues in a comprehensive, detailed, and logical way, providing clear underpinning for both application and critical judgment.

Economics students need to evaluate economic and/or business arguments using accurate qualitative and quantitative judgements supported by relevant economic and/or business concepts/theories/models. Use detailed chains of reasoning to come to supported and balanced judgements about economic and/or business issues. Show a full awareness of the validity and significance of competing arguments. Use economic and/or business terms, data and graphs with precision to contextualise the causes/impact of economic and business issues on economic and/or business agents.

Key Stage 3

Overview of the KS3 Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 7• Understanding computer systems
• Using computers effectively & responsibly (Esafety)
• Understanding Computers
• Health & Safety
• Number Systems
• Scratch programming
• Spreadsheets
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
Students will be able to use software under the control of the teacher to
• create,
• store
• edit digital content using appropriate file and folder names.
Students shall be able to
• share the use of technology in school.
Additionally, students can show
• use of computers safely and responsibly, knowing a range of ways to report unacceptable content and contact when online.
• Make justified decisions when using computers online
• Store & analyse data
• They will also be able to explain and justify how the use of technology impacts on society, from the perspective of social, economical, political, legal, ethical and moral issues.
Have a speaker come in: local police on how to stay safe online

IT: School IT staff to come to show parts of a computer
Year 8• Flowal
• Kodu
• E Safety & Cyber Security
• Movie Maker
• Databases
• Small basic
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
• Design simple algorithms using loops, and selection i.e. if statements,
• Use logical reasoning to predict outcomes,
• Create programs that implement algorithms to achieve given goals and use a range of operators and expressions e.g. Boolean, and apply them in the context of program control.
Visit to a museum: Bletchley Park

Have a speaker come in: local police on how to stay safe online

IT: School IT staff to come to show parts of computer

After school club; programming
Year 9• Implications of digital systems
• Business finance: saving & spending
• Create Apps
• Python
• Networks
• BBC Microbit
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
• Students will know the need for, and can write, custom functions including use of parameters,
• Use negation with operators and manipulate one dimensional data structures. This will give students skills on how to find and correct syntactical errors and know the difference between ‘While’ loop and ‘For’ loop, which I can use as a loop counter.
• In addition students will grasp skills and know the hardware associated with networking computer systems, including WANs and LANs, I know their purpose and how they work, including MAC addresses, know data transmission between digital computers over networks, including the internet i.e. IP addresses and packet switching.
Mobile apps on mobile phones

Microbits – using in class/after school Club

Programming – After school club

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Business & IT:

Students must be able to understand key terminology in computer science to progress in the subject so that the skills they learn can be taken through to KS4 & 5. The curriculum is based on making the students aware of online safety, basic skills in computing and recognising ethical issues surrounding the application of information technology beyond school.  We use a selection of programming languages: Small Basic, Kodu, Scratch & Python, skills for applications such as Word, spreadsheets, database, Moviemaker and PowerPoint. These skills are needed to progress in this subject if a student opts to study it in KS4 or KS5, but just as important it provides the skills for students, who may not take the subject at a higher level, to take an active part in a society, in which ICT plays a greater role each and every day, one where computer literacy is just as important as literacy and numeracy.

A high-quality computing education equips students to use computational thinking and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing has deep links with mathematics, science, and design and technology, and provides insights into both natural and artificial systems. The core of computing is computer science, in which students are taught the principles of information and computation, how digital systems work, and how to put this knowledge to use through programming. Building on this knowledge and understanding, students are equipped to use information technology to create programs, systems and a range of content. Computing also ensures that students become digitally literate – able to use, and express themselves and develop their ideas through, information and communication technology – at a level suitable for the future workplace and as active participants in a digital world.

We have undertaken an audit of the KS2 provision from the local feeder schools and their ICT provision.  From this, we have built a KS3 curriculum that follows on from their KS2 experience and also hits all the aspects required to deliver the required elements from the KS3 National Curriculum. The curriculum is planned so that they initially develop an e-safety awareness over the three years that is comprehensive in nature. The remaining curriculum is designed to engage the students in ICT and computing and to provide a taster of what they could pursue and develop careers in. The skills developed in each year are built up/recapped and expanded in the following year to develop the students ICT skill capabilities. The topics in KS3 also lead to a good skill set required to undertake current KS4 ICT subjects and even KS5 in the future.

Year 7

The focus at the start of a student’s Key Stage 3 journey is to ensure that all students are fully aware of how to be safe online and understand their digital footprint. Although this is studied at a primary level, our unit gives them a stronger understanding of how it affects them at their current age and as they progress throughout secondary school. We explore student’s previous learning and build upon this to ensure students make sensible choices. We then move on to understanding computers making students aware of the various hardware and software, leading into Health & Safety.  Number Systems will be a topic that will then go into Binary and the maths side of computing and assist students into Scratch programming, where students will be able to create simple programs using blocks. We will finish the term with Spreadsheets allowing students to input, analyse, manipulate and store data. 

Year 8

Gaps in knowledge come mainly from an understanding of programming. We have designed our units and resources to build students’ programming knowledge and skill level using different programming platforms, but we also allow for students to work at an independent pace based on their needs. This term will start with Flowal where students will be able to use basic algorithms to follow simple instructions following straight into Kodu, giving students further knowledge into programming where they will experience a different environment and this will lead onto later, Small Basic, a higher level language.  We then re-visit E Safety & Cyber Security, developing the depth and complexity from Year 7 so students gain further knowledge and the topic is embedded further. Movie Maker will be visited towards the end of Year 8 allowing the students to explore editing images and string images, leading onto creating a movie. 

The skills that we will be covering: 

  • Technological Expertise – or at the very least, a very solid working understanding of the latest filming technology and software
  • Flexible Creativity
  • Written and Visual Storytelling
  • Decisive and Problem-Solving Leadership
  • Communication
  • Databases – the year will end with students gaining knowledge of storing, inputting and manipulating data. 

Year 9

Students start to study Business finance in Year 9: saving & spending, this will allow students to explore business, in preparation for their GCSE options. 

In their continued IT-focused lessons, students have a chance to be hands-on and create apps giving them physical experience. This fits into BBC Microsoft where students can program and gain vital competencies and skills in critical thinking and collaboration, building their ability and confidence to have ideas, share them and make them Students will be able to understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science this year, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation and can analyse problems in computational terms. Students will have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems whilst studying Python and networks.  

The key steps that will be taken to ensure that students gain a broad and balanced knowledge within Business/ICT:

When students begin their IT and Computing journey in secondary school it is important for them to start with matters of online safety to continue learning and using technology in a safe manner. Students need to be aware of their digital footprint and understand how their behaviour online affects them and others. Therefore, we begin with the E-Safety topic. Students build on their basic programming skills and understanding of computer fundamentals (binary, health & safety, hardware etc.) throughout our Year 7 units – Scratch and Spreadsheets. This then builds and supports their ability to transfer the same programming concepts needed in Year 8 and Year 9 for more advanced text-based programming, such as Small basic and Python. 

Students learn early in KS3 how to problem solve by decomposing a problem and using algorithms, a vital skill needed when programming at any level. These skills are also transferable to the way students solve problems in other subjects. Students build their confidence and ability to use such software across a range of units. Each unit stems from learning how to use graphics software, as skills can be transferred across the other units. Flowal and Movie Maker both require knowledge and understanding of the tools within each software package. By the end of Year 9, students will have gained and refined their skills to use multiple applications. Students will have experienced a range of topics during KS3 that will support them in making choices for KS4. Each unit also gives insight into how they relate to the real world and possible career choices.

Key Stage 4

We aim to ensure that all students are taught…

Computer Science

Overview of the KS4 Computer Science Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 10• 1.1 Systems architecture
• 1.2 Memory and storage
• 1.3 Computer networks, connections and
protocols
• 1.4 Network security
• 1.5 Systems software
• 1.6 Ethical, legal, cultural and environmental
impacts of digital technology
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
Students are able to debug and create programs in high level language giving them further knowledge and skills to create games and various programs.

Develop problem-solving and decision-making and Investigate, analyse and evaluate various programming elements.

The topics studied in 1.6 Ethical, Legal, Environmental and Cultural Concerns play a large part in teaching students about how technology and computer science can have a profound, positive effect on society. Students are taught about the ethical impact of technology, such as the use of artificial intelligence and robotics in the workplace. They are educated in the environmental issues that are created and how they can limit the impact of these issues. Students learn about the legal aspects of the use of technology and how to behave safely and respectfully online and using others digital property.
Students will have a chance to visit companies such as Amazon and Microsoft to experience work based environments.

In addition companies will be visiting the school and delivering various lessons in IT such as:
• IT specialist
• Cisco
Year 112.1 Algorithms
• 2.2 Programming fundamentals • 2.3 Producing robust programs • 2.4 Boolean logic
• 2.5 Programming languages and Integrated Development Environments
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
Students are able to debug and create programs in high-level language giving them further knowledge and skills to create games and various programs.
Develop problem-solving and decision-making and Investigate, analyse and evaluate various programming elements.
Students will have a chance to visit companies such as Amazon and Microsoft, to experience work based environments.

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Computer Science:

Computer Science is engaging and practical, encouraging creativity and problem-solving. It encourages students to work independently to develop well thought out solutions and develop strong resilience which is required in the world of computer science. Computer Science encourages students to develop their understanding and application of the core concepts in computer science. Students also analyse problems in computational terms and devise creative solutions by designing, writing, testing and evaluating programs.

Students need to understand how the CPU functions which is at the heart of the computer and its architecture. This knowledge will allow them to understand the other topics such as hardware, software and storage devices which allows students to grasp key concepts in other topic areas in the course as they are all linked to the CPU. It’s a great way to develop critical thinking, analysis and problem-solving skills, which can be transferred to further learning and to everyday life. Students who want to go on to higher study and employment in the field of computer science will find it provides a superb stepping stone. It has strong links with mathematics and will support student’s determination to complete set tasks. Computer Science is part of the English Baccalaureate and it will be included as one of the qualifications that count towards new school performance measures. Any Computing specifications included in the EBacc have to be approved by BCS (The Chartered Institute for IT) – and our GCSE Computing has been.

At the start of Year 10 students are introduced to the Central Processing Unit (CPU), computer memory and storage, wired and wireless networks, network topologies, system security and system software. Students should already be familiar with these topics as the KS3 curriculum we deliver already has included these topics to a level that is required by the KS3 National Curriculum. 

Year 10

At the start of Year 10 students are introduced to the Central Processing Unit (CPU), computer memory and storage, wired and wireless networks, network topologies, system security and system software. We also look at ethical, legal, cultural and environmental concerns associated with computer science. The course runs smoothly from KS3 and leads straight into KS5 giving students sufficient knowledge on analysing problems in computational terms and devising creative solutions by designing, writing, testing and evaluating programs. Students apply knowledge and understanding gained in component 01.

Students begin KS4 starting with programming, reinforcing their understanding from KS3 and learning more complex techniques that are needed for component 2 of their exams. Students then move on to learning about the structure of a computer system, learning in-depth how the components function together. Students learn how a system works ‘behind the scenes’ and its hardware before understanding how a system processes data and carries out instructions, using input, process storage and output. 

Students learn how to use abstraction, decomposition, and algorithmic thinking to define a problem. They expand their knowledge of designing structure diagrams & flowcharts and use this to effectively write Pseudocode when planning to write a program.

Students learn to efficiently search and sort data and apply this to their programs. Alongside the algorithms unit, students continue to expand their knowledge and independence in programming, learning that there are different ways in which a problem can be solved. Students cover a range of programming fundamental skills in more depth to create fully working, real-world examples of systems. They work through a continuous system cycle of planning, creating, testing, debugging, and revisiting their plans. In the System Software unit, students learn about the software needed in computer systems. They look at different operating systems & interfaces. Understanding the important function of an OS, as well as learning about utility software such as encryption, defragmentation and file management & data compression. 

Year 11

Students begin Year 11 with the Computer Network Connections & Protocols, Network Security unit, learning in-depth about how networks are formed, how we communicate and understanding the hardware needed for the transmission of data and communication. Students learn about the everyday threats to our computer systems and networks, understanding the types of malicious threats and how to avoid them. 

This Ethical, Legal, Environmental and Cultural Concerns unit focuses on the issues that are created and addressed by technology, and the impact on society. This includes ethical, legal, cultural, and environmental impacts. Students look at how technology affects our daily privacy and the legal implications such as; Data Protection, computer misuse, copyright and licenses.  Students have learnt about testing throughout their programming experiences. The Producing Robust Programs, Programming Languages & IDEs unit goes into greater depth about testing and debugging a program. Students learn about defensive programming and the use of defensive designs while continuing to create code that is easy to maintain and knowing the purpose of testing and types used for validation. Students then revisit algorithms and programming in preparation for their final exams. Students learn the characteristics of both high and low-level languages, looking at translators, compilers, interpreters, tools in an IDE; editors, error diagnostics, run-time environments & translators. 

The key steps that will be taken to ensure that students gain a broad and balanced knowledge within Computer Science:

By the end of Key Stage 4, pupils will be able to develop their capability, creativity and knowledge in science, digital media and information technology. Using practical skills develop and apply their analytic, problem-solving, design, and computational thinking skills. Pupils will understand how changes in technology affect safety, including new ways to protect their online privacy and identity, and how to identify and report a range of concerns. The topics taught will be sequenced so that they flow and interlink with all of the Paper 1 topics taught in Year 10, progressing to the Paper 2 topics in Year 11 with the programming elements for computational thinking.

GCSE Business Studies

Overview of the KS4 Business Studies Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 10• Enterprise and entrepreneurship
• Spotting a business opportunity
• Putting a business idea into practice
• Making the business effective
• Understanding external influences on business
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management

Apply knowledge and understanding to business decision making, including:
• The interdependent nature of business activity; influences on business; business operations, finance, marketing and human resources; and how these interdependencies underpin business decision making
• How different business contexts affect business decisions
• The use and limitation of quantitative and qualitative data in making business decisions

Trips to a suitable business.

Young Enterprise events
Year 11• Growing the business
• Making marketing decisions
• Making operational decisions
• Making financial decisions
• Making human resource decisions
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
Develop problem-solving and decision-making skills relevant to business

Investigate, analyse and evaluate business opportunities and issues

Make justified decisions using both qualitative and quantitative data, including its selection, interpretation, analysis and evaluation, and the application of appropriate quantitative skills.
Trips to a suitable business.

Young Enterprise events

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Business Studies:

Students must draw on their knowledge and understanding of Theme 1 which is all about how a business is created and the processes needed to run day to day operations & Theme 2 which is about how businesses grow and develop over time developing topics covered in Year 10. Students also have to apply a range of quantitative skills relevant to business contexts. This includes calculations and the interpretation, use and limitation of quantitative and qualitative data in business contexts to support, inform and justify business decisions.

Year 10 content starts off with enterprise and the entrepreneur which is the first and main factor of any business creation gives the basic foundations of the subject that we then build upon in year 11 as well as the knowledge already gained in KS3 developing the students business skills.

Year 10

Theme 1 concentrates on the key business concepts, issues and skills involved in starting and running a small business. It provides a framework for students to explore core concepts through the lens of an entrepreneur setting up a business. In this theme, students will be introduced to local and national business contexts and will develop an understanding of how these contexts impact business behaviour and decisions. Local contexts refer specifically to small businesses or those operating in a single UK location and national contexts relate to businesses operating in more than one location or across the UK. Students must develop an understanding of the interdependent nature of business activity through interactions between business operations, finance, marketing and human resources, as well as the relationship between the business and the environment in which it operates. Students must understand how these interdependencies and relationships underpin business decisions. Teaching approaches to the content must reflect this.

Year 11

Theme 2 examines how a business develops beyond the start-up phase. It focuses on the key business concepts, issues and decisions used to grow a business, with emphasis on aspects of marketing, operations, finance and human resources. Theme 2 also considers the impact of the wider world on the decisions a business makes as it grows. In this theme, students will be introduced to national and global business contexts and will develop an understanding of how these contexts impact business behaviour and decisions. National contexts build on those in Theme 1 and relate to businesses operating in more than one location or across the UK. Global contexts relate to non-UK or transnational businesses. Students must develop an understanding of the interdependent nature of business activity through interactions between business operations, finance, marketing and human resources, as well as the relationship between the business and the environment in which it operates. Students must understand how these functional areas influence business activity and how interdependencies and relationships between them underpin business decisions.

The key steps that will be taken to ensure that students gain a broad and balanced knowledge within Business Studies:

 Time is spent building exam skills, particularly focusing on knowledge, application and analysis type questions. All topics taught will be related to real-life scenarios and applications, so it is important that students take an active role in reading economic/business developments on a daily basis, to clarify understanding and to also include this live knowledge in their end of year examinations to demonstrate their analysis, application and understanding of economic problems.  Students will be encouraged to keep abreast of current business developments by reading BBC Business news daily.

Key Stage 5

We aim to ensure that all students are taught…

Cambridge Technicals Level 3 IT

Overview of the KS5 IT Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 12• Unit 1: Fundamentals of IT

• Unit 2: Global Information

Unit 17: Internet of Everything
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management

Students are given necessary skills and knowledge to seek employment in areas that utilise computing, and continue to develop through practical experience and training.
• Interview skills
• Employer involvement
• Presentation Skills: Make justified decisions
• Project management
• Intrapersonal skills: communicating, working collaboratively, negotiating and influencing, self-presentation
• Interpersonal skills: self-management, adaptability and resilience, self-monitoring and development.

Students will have a chance to visit companies such as Amazon to experience work-based environments
Year 13Unit 5: Virtual & Augmented Reality

Unit 8: Project Management
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
Students are given the necessary skills and knowledge to seek employment in areas that utilise computing and continue to develop through practical experience and training.
• Presentation skills
• App creation: Make justified decisions
• Referencing
• Cognitive and problem-solving skills: use critical thinking, approach non-routine problems applying expert and creative solutions, use systems and technology
• The ability to learn independently
• The ability to research actively and methodically
• Giving presentations and being active group members.
Students will have a chance to visit companies such as Amazon to experience work-based environments

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in IT:

Cambridge Technicals is engaging and practical, encouraging creativity and problem-solving. It encourages students to work independently to develop well thought out solutions and develop strong resilience which is required in the world of IT. The course encourages students to analyse problems, work/business scenarios and be able to grasp the concepts in a real-world business environment. Such as how businesses store information, why and where the information is stored, leading to effectiveness. 

KS5 begins with the two mandatory exam units to give students the knowledge of the course and the necessary skills students will require to understand the coursework units. Unit 1 and 2 covers how information is held and used by different users, leading to how organisations use internal and external sources of data and the types of information that may be found. Topics studied are; computer hardware, software, understanding business IT systems, employability and communication skills together with understanding the ethical and operational issues and threats to computer systems. This course runs smoothly from KS4 so knowledge and skills are easily built upon. 

Students will then go on to studying 3 coursework units:  17, 5 & 8  are completed in Year 13.

Year 12

At the start of Year, 12 students study computer hardware, software understanding business IT systems, employability and communication skills together with understanding the ethical and operational issues and threats to computer systems, giving students prior knowledge of the basics of IT (Unit 1). This course runs smoothly from KS4 so knowledge and skills are easily built upon. Students go on to further develop their learning in these areas by understanding the fundamentals of IT initially then transferring these skills in business /employability. Unit 2 looks into how information is transmitted globally and the benefits to individuals and organisations. This enables the students to understand the business side of IT and explore how IT is used within the organisations. 

Students are also given the necessary skills and knowledge to seek employment in areas that utilise computing, and continue to develop through practical experience and training.

  • Interview skills & Employer involvement is both taught through units 1 & 2 so that students understand the key concepts of how to transfer these skills in further education or employment. 
  • Presentation Skills & Project management is both taught through the coursework units so that students can portray through the work the skills of presentations and manage a project then transfer them in future career or further education. 

Year 13

Students will then go on to studying 3 coursework units:  17, 5 & 8  are completed in Year 13.

The skills and knowledge taught in Year 12 will allow students to be able to effectively complete Unit 17 & 8 as they look at the Into Internet of Everything and Project Management. Unit 5 explores Augmented & Virtual Reality allowing students to build upon skills taught in Year 12 and independently create an App. 

Students will be able to develop in terms of looking for a job effectively, interview skills & project management.

They will be able to go into further education and complete a course in IT or Computer Science.

The key steps that will be taken to ensure that students gain a broad and balanced knowledge within Cambridge Technicals Level 3 IT:

Throughout the year we ensure knowledge is embedded by:  

  • Giving students topic tests at the end of each unit to assess their understanding  
  • Ensuring all students are given support material such as a course companion and keywords/definitions which are referred to each lesson

Checklists are used that mirror the course specification objective, so students are able to reflect on their understanding regularly, identifying areas for independent study. We use Cornell note-taking with students when they are watching concept videos to support their understanding when they revisit a topic. Practice exam questions are worked on in class and for homework regularly to help to further develop knowledge and skills.

BTEC National Extended Certificate in Law

KS5 Curriculum Intent:

The Pearson BTEC National Extended Certificate in Applied Law is an Applied General qualification for post-16 learners who want to continue their education through applied learning and who aim to progress to higher education and ultimately to employment, possibly in the legal sector. The qualification is equivalent in size to one A Level and aims to provide a detailed introduction to the legal sector. 

The content of this qualification has been developed in consultation with academics to ensure that it supports progression to higher education. It includes the opportunity to develop the research, communication, presentation, decision-making and critical-thinking skills valued by higher education. In addition, employers have been involved and consulted in order to confirm that the content is appropriate and consistent with current practice for learners planning to enter employment directly in the legal sector. 

Overview of the KS5 Law Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 12Unit 1 Dispute Solving in Civil Law.

• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of precedent, the civil justice system and process and the concept of negligence in English civil law, together with legal skills of research and communication.
• Be able to apply knowledge and understanding to examine negligence scenarios and advise clients on the likely outcome of negligence claims, making connections to precedent, courts and appeals, personnel and funding
• Analyse legal information demonstrating the ability to interpret the potential impact and influence on future cases
• Evaluate evidence to make informed judgements with appropriate justification, synthesising ideas and evidence from several sources to support arguments

Unit 2 Investigating Aspects of Criminal Law and the Legal System

• Explore how statutory rules are made and interpreted
• Examine how legislation is made outside of Parliament
• Explore the various legal personnel involved in a criminal trial
• Apply the key elements of crime and sentencing in non-fatal offence case studies.
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
• Cognitive and problem-solving skills: use critical thinking, approach non-routine problems applying expert and creative solutions, use systems and technology
• Intrapersonal skills: communicating, working collaboratively, negotiating and influencing, self-presentation
• Interpersonal skills: self-management, adaptability and resilience, self-monitoring and development.
• Reading legal texts
• effective writing
• analytical skills
• creative development
• Preparation for assessment methods used in degrees.
• The ability to learn independently
• The ability to research actively and methodically
• Giving presentations and being active group members.
• Visits to the Magistrates Court and Crown Court public galleries.
• Law Moot competition with Wolverhampton University.
• Visiting speakers.
Year 13Unit 3: Applying the Law

• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of both homicide and offences against property together with the law relating to police procedure using legal terminology
• Apply the laws relating to both homicide and offences against property together with the law relating to police procedure, using legal terminology and relevant case law and statute law to illustrate points made and make connections
• Analyse the law relating to homicide, property
offences and police procedure, demonstrating the ability to interpret the potential impact, outcome and influence on future cases
• Evaluate evidence to make informed judgements with appropriate justification, synthesising ideas and evidence from several sources to support arguments

Unit 7: Aspects of Tort
• Examine the principles of tort and liability in negligence for psychiatric harm
• Explore liability for economic loss and negligent misstatements
• Investigate the law on occupiers’ liability and vicarious liability
• Explore liability for private nuisance and Rylands v Fletcher.
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
Visiting Speakers

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Law:

Students must acquire advanced knowledge of the civil and criminal law of England and Wales to progress.  They must be able to apply legal principles to argue a case based on the facts and merits of a case in either a civil or criminal context, giving advice to clients on the likely outcomes of said cases and the possible conclusion, i.e. sentences, awards of damages a defendant may face as a result of these hearings.

As this course is not offered at KS4 students begin the course from basic principles starting with an overview of civil and criminal law, how laws are made and enforced, including all the roles undertaken in the judicial system.  

Year 12

Unit 1: Dispute Solving in Civil Law gives an understanding of the civil court system and basic understanding of the application of the Tort of Negligence which is the predominant type of law dealt with in the Civil courts process.  From there we move on to study Unit 2: Investigating Aspects of Criminal Law and the Legal System which covers the basic understanding of the physical crimes that can be committed against people, the necessary level of proof for each offence to enable prosecution, defences available to Defendants, and possible outcomes if found guilty of any of these offences.

Year 13

In Year 13 we build upon all the content delivered in Year 12. In Unit 3: Applying the Law, we develop the law from the offences against the person in Unit 2, to the most serious area of law, murder and manslaughter.  Again, students understand the detail required to convict a person for any of these offences, defences available to defendants, sentences available if found guilty of any of these offences. 

In the teaching of Unit 7, we are building upon the knowledge gained in Unit 1 around other Torts in Civil law that will probably affect some of our students in their future lives, helping to provide a strong foundational knowledge of relevant laws for adult life.

The key steps that will be taken to ensure that students gain a broad and balanced knowledge within Law:

Time is spent in Year 12 building exam skills, particularly focusing on knowledge, application and analysis type questions.  This is due to Unit 1 being an External timed assessment, based around an unseen scenario.  As such knowledge of the subject is also assessed via timed pieces of work in lessons, to demonstrate what is required in the final examination.  Unit 2 is a research task again based around scenarios and is an internal coursework task.  So the emphasis is more research, application and analysis with a final overall conclusion.  Therefore researching,  report writing and referencing skills are developed in the teaching of this part of the course, helping to broaden students’ transferable skills.  

AQA A-Level Accounting

Students of Accounting at Holyhead will learn both financial accounting and the recording of past events, and management accounting as a means of planning and decision making. Students should appreciate that these are not totally distinct areas of study and that there is an interrelationship between financial accounting and aspects of management accounting. 

Students will develop an understanding of the principles of ethical behaviour which inform the actions of all those working within an accounting environment.

Students must demonstrate a good understanding of the double-entry model and accounting principles and concepts as these form the foundation of all financial accounting techniques. They will also need to demonstrate quantitative skills that are relevant to the subject. 

Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the formulae used for computations, carrying out computations and use the results of computations to inform judgements, solve problems and make decisions. 

Students must focus on developing their ability to write effectively so that they can report to stakeholders, making logical arguments and providing sound judgements based on analysis of available evidence taking account of financial and non-financial factors. 

Students should be encouraged to keep up to date with financial news including announcements concerning the performance of leading UK businesses and be given the opportunity to investigate their published accounts.

Overview of the AL Accounting Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 12• An introduction to the role of the accountant in business
• Types of business organisation
• The double entry model
• Verification of accounting records
• Accounting concepts used in the preparation of accounting records
• Preparation of financial statements of sole traders
• Limited company accounts
• Analysis and evaluation of financial information
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
• Record transactions using double entry bookkeeping, verify the accuracy of the bookkeeping and correct any errors
• Prepare financial statements for sole traders and limited companies, including recording adjustments, by applying knowledge of accounting concepts
• Calculate and interpret accounting ratios
• Analyse and evaluate business performance using accounting techniques to interpret financial information
• Develop a logical and methodical approach to problem solving through the analysis and evaluation of financial and management information
• Prepare, analyse and evaluate budgets including the calculation and interpretation of variances
• Prepare information using costing techniques to enable managers to make decisions
• Present and communicate accounting information, numerically, graphically and in written form, so that it can be understood by non-accountants and can be used by stakeholders for decision making purposes
• Analyse and evaluate projects through the application of capital investment appraisal measures
• Prepare financial statements for businesses with incomplete records
• Prepare financial statements for partnerships
• Prepare information to enable managers to plan, control and make decisions using a range of accounting techniques such as: absorption costing, activity based costing and standard costing
• Evaluate the benefits and limitations of management accounting systems and techniques in providing information to enable managers to plan, control and make decisions
• Prepare statements of cash flow
• Evaluate the benefits and limitations of financial reporting in communicating information to a range of stakeholders to enable them to reach informed opinions about the organisation
• Analyse situations to identify ethical considerations and suggest appropriate actions.
Students will have a chance to visit companies such as Amazon to experience work-based environments
Year 13• Budgeting
• Marginal costing
• Standard costing and variance analysis
• Absorption and activity based costing
• Capital investment appraisal
• Accounting for organisations with incomplete records
• Partnership accounts
• Accounting for limited companies
• Interpretation, analysis and communication of accounting information
• The impact of ethical considerations
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Accounting:

Students must demonstrate a good understanding of the double-entry model and accounting principles and concepts as these form the foundation of all financial accounting techniques. They will also need to demonstrate quantitative skills that are relevant to the subject. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the formulae used for computations, carrying out computations and use the results of computations to inform judgements, solve problems and make decisions. Students must focus on developing their ability to write effectively so that they can report to stakeholders, making logical arguments and providing sound judgements based on analysis of available evidence taking account of financial and non-financial factors. 

As this course is not offered by any exam board at KS4 students begin the course from basic principles starting with an overview of the financial accounting process and why the subject is relevant in any business organisation.  

Year 12

Students begin the course from basic principles starting with an overview of the financial accounting process and why the subject is relevant in any business organisation.  We then move onto the basics of double-entry and build the skills required until students can complete financial documents independently, making adjustments as required and analyse and justify decisions based upon the financial documents they have created or have been given in a scenario.

Year 13

In Year 13 we build upon all the content delivered in Year 12, taking it to a more advanced level and then we also introduce management accounting techniques which are used to analyse and justify decisions based upon the financial documents they have created or have been given in a scenario.

The key steps that will be taken to ensure that students gain a broad and balanced knowledge within Accounting:

Time is spent in Year 12 building exam skills, particularly focusing on knowledge, application and analysis type questions.  This is the main area of assessment in Part A and B of their final examination and represents over 60% of their final marks, and students must have excellent examination skills to be able to cope with the challenge presented in the examinations.  At the end of Year 12 and moving into Year 13 we develop the evaluative skills required to tackle Part C of their final examination, the extended written answer.  The reason for not tackling these skills earlier is that they must have a comprehensive knowledge of all the Year 12 content before they could even tackle this type of question as it can draw upon any and every area of the syllabus.

One Year GCSE Economics

Students studying GCSE Economics at Holyhead will learn about economic activity through the lens of consumers, producers, government and the workings of the global economy. As students go through the course they’re presented with opportunities to focus on real-world issues. Students should consider and reflect upon moral, ethical and sustainable issues that arise as a result of the impact of economic activity.

Students should use their economic knowledge and skills to investigate national and global economic situations and issues from the last 15 years. 

Students should also be aware of the policies that governments have used to attempt to manage these situations and issues.

Students will develop quantitative skills relevant to the subject content. They should be able to make relevant calculations from economic data and be able to interpret data presented in the form of graphs and charts. Students should be able to recognise the possible limitations of both quantitative and qualitative data.

Overview of the Economics Curriculum;

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 12• Economic foundations
• Resource allocation
• How prices are determined
• Production, costs, revenue and profit
• Competitive and concentrated markets
• Market failure
• Introduction to the national economy
• Government objectives
• How the government manages the economy
• International trade and the global economy
• The role of money and financial markets
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
Students need to have acquired competence in the quantitative skills that are relevant to the subject content and which are applied in the context of an GCSE Economics including:
• Calculating percentages and percentage changes, including interest on savings
• Calculating averages including cost
• Calculating totals including revenue costs and profit
• Calculating income including gross and net pay
• Constructing graphs from data including supply and demand curves
• Interpreting and using information from graphs and charts to support and justify economic decisions
• Interpreting and using economic data to support and justify economic decisions.
Reading live economic/business news articles.

Economics conferences

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Economics:

Students will look at economic foundations such as the nature and purpose of economic activity, the factors of production and the importance of making choices. Students will also look at how resources are allocated using a market mechanism. The central aspect will be an investigation of how prices are determined. This introduces students to concepts such as supply and demand, Intermarket relationships and price elasticity. Students investigate the significance of costs, revenue and profit for producers, leading to an understanding of the concepts of production, productivity and economies of scale. Students will then explore the importance of competition in relation to resource allocation, leading to an investigation of the factors that lead to market failure, with an emphasis on the significance of externalities. Students should be encouraged to explore the moral, ethical and sustainability issues that underpin economic decision-making and economic activity. Students are then introduced to the wider economy from the perspective of the main economic groups: consumers, producers and government. Students explore the significance of interest rates including their impact on saving, borrowing and spending. The core of this unit will focus on government objectives and their role in managing the economy. A range of policies will be explored in relation to the objectives, highlighting the fact that pursuing one objective can have a detrimental effect on other objectives. Students also examine why countries trade, and the significance of the global economy, including free-trade agreements. Finally, students will explore the role of money and the significance of the financial markets in modern economies. Students should be encouraged to explore the moral, ethical and sustainability issues that underpin all aspects of managing an economy. 

This is a one year course for students, who are resitting Mathematics and English at GCSE level.  We have selected Economics as it is in the Business Faculties group of subjects, which students may have studied at KS4, but something completely new, to enrich and challenge students’ knowledge and understanding of the world around them.

Year 12

The rationale is very simple: we start off with microeconomic principles which revolve around an individual person’s/businesses perspective for economic choices. Once this is established we move into the macroeconomic environment in how markets work and the features of markets and how governments and institutions manage and control the economy of a country.

The key steps that will be taken to ensure that students gain a broad and balanced knowledge within Economics:

Time is spent in year 12 building exam skills, particularly focusing on knowledge, application and analysis type questions. All topics taught will be related to real-life scenarios and applications, so it is important that students take an active role in reading economic/business developments on a daily basis, to clarify understanding and to also include this live knowledge in their end of year examinations to demonstrate their analysis, application and understanding of economic problems.

BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Business

The Pearson BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Business is an Applied General qualification. It is for post-16 learners who want to continue their education through applied learning. It is equivalent in size to one A-Level and has been designed as a full two-year programme. The qualification aims to provide a wide-ranging study of the sector for learners who wish to pursue a career in business.

Overview of the L3 Business Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 12Unit 1 Exploring Business
Learners study the purposes of different businesses, their structure, the effect of the external environment, and how they need to be dynamic and innovative to survive. Topics covered include:
• Exploring the features of different businesses and analyse what makes them successful
• Investigate how businesses are organised
• Examine the environment in which businesses operate
• Examine business markets
• Investigate the role and contribution of innovation and enterprise to business success
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
• Cognitive and problem-solving skills: use critical thinking, approach non-routine problems applying expert and creative solutions, use systems and technology
• Intrapersonal skills: communicating, working collaboratively, negotiating and influencing, self-presentation
• Interpersonal skills: self-management, adaptability and resilience, self-monitoring and development.
• Reading business articles and texts
• Effective academic writing
• Analytical skills
• Creative development
• Preparation for assessment methods used in degrees.
• The ability to learn independently
• The ability to research actively and methodically
• Public speaking and delivering presentations, and active listening
• Demonstrate knowledge of terms, concepts, theories, methods and models to show an understanding of how individuals and organisations are affected by and respond to business issues
• Apply knowledge and understanding to various business contexts to show how individuals and organisations are affected by and respond to issues
• Analyse issues within business, showing an understanding of the impact on individuals and organisations of external and internal influences
• Evaluate qualitative and quantitative evidence to make informed judgements and propose evidence-based solutions to business issues
Visits to the organisations that students choose to base their coursework on.

Visiting speakers.
Year 13Unit 22: Market Research

Learners examine the different aspects of market research used by businesses. They will undertake a research project, interpret their findings and produce a report. Topics covered include:

• Examining the types of market research used in business.
• Plan and implement a market research activity to meet a specific marketing objective
• Analyse and present market research findings and recommend process improvements

Unit 2: Developing a Marketing Campaign

Learners will gain skills relating to, and an understanding of, how a marketing campaign is developed.
Topics covered include:

• An introduction to the principles and purposes of marketing that underpin the creation of a rationale for a marketing campaign.
• The role of marketing Principles and purposes of marketing
• Influences on marketing activity
• Purpose of researching information to identify the needs and wants of customers
• Market research methods and use
• Developing the rationale
• Marketing campaign activity – Selection of appropriate marketing aims and objectives to suit business goals.
• Marketing mix
• The marketing campaign
• Appropriateness of marketing campaign
Unit 3 Personal and Business Finance
• Understand the importance of managing personal finance
• Explore the personal finance sector
• Understand the purpose of accounting
• Select and evaluate different sources of business finance
• Break-even and cash flow forecasts
• Complete statements of comprehensive income and financial position and evaluate a business’s performance
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
Visiting Speakers

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Business:

Students must investigate different types and sizes of organisations in various business sectors and environments, and in local, national and global contexts.  They then have to develop their knowledge, skills and understanding in business, students need to have acquired competence in quantitative skills that are relevant to and applied in the business context that is supplied to them in the assessments. 

We do not offer BTEC Business in KS4, however, this course naturally builds upon the learning and skills development undertaken in KS4 with our GCSE Business course.  We start off with Unit 1 Exploring Business and Unit 2 Developing a Marketing Campaign as it is not only engaging but also links to skills developed in KS3/KS4 with lots of real examples we can draw upon in the news and the student’s own life experiences as they are all already consumers and are impacted by marketing on a daily basis. 

Year 12

Unit 1 Exploring Business is an introduction to the course and introduces the main concepts and skills required by all students.  The students are then able to build on their learning through the remainder of the units in Year 12 and Year 13.  We also complete Unit 2 Developing a Marketing Campaign in Year 12 as this is a pre-release exam that students are entered for in May. We use the time available between January and May to develop the relevant knowledge and skills in preparation for the examination.

Year 13

In Year 13 we build upon all the content delivered in Year 12.  We move onto Unit 3 Personal and Business Finance which is an exam based so students need to develop comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the key concepts, but also make sure they enhance on the exam techniques which were utilised in their work on Unit 2 in Year 12.  Our final piece of coursework is Unit 22 Market Research in which students complete a research task and use most of the skills learned previously in the course, a process in itself that helps students to develop skills suited to the requirements of degree-level study.

The key steps that will be taken to ensure that students gain a broad and balanced knowledge within Business:

Time is spent in Year 12 building exam skills, particularly focusing on knowledge, application and analysis type questions.  This is due to Unit 2 being a pre-release styled exam.  As such knowledge of the subject is also assessed via timed pieces of work in lessons, to demonstrate what is required in the final examination.  Unit 1 is an internal coursework task again based around scenarios, so the emphasis is more research, application and analysis with a final overall conclusion.  So research,  report writing and referencing skills are developed in this manner.  Unit 3 is an examination topic and Unit 22 is a coursework module following the same pattern of assessment but linking back into all other content.

Pearson GCE A-level Business

Students studying A-level Business at Holyhead will learn to develop an enthusiasm for studying business, gain a holistic understanding of business in a range of contexts and develop a critical understanding of organisations and their ability to meet society’s needs and wants.  Students will also need to be able to understand that business behaviour can be studied from a range of perspectives, generate enterprising and creative approaches to business opportunities, problems and issues, be aware of the ethical dilemmas and responsibilities faced by organisations and individuals, and acquire a range of relevant business and generic skills, including decision making, problem-solving, the challenging of assumptions and critical analysis as well as apply numerical skills in a range of business contexts. 

Students are introduced to business in Themes 1 and 2 through building knowledge of core business concepts and applying them to business contexts to develop a broad understanding of how businesses work. Breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding, with applications to a wider range of contexts and more complex business information, are developed in Themes 3 and 4, requiring students to take a more strategic view of business opportunities and issues. Students are encouraged to use an enquiring, critical and thoughtful approach to the study of business, to understand that business behaviour can be studied from a range of perspectives and to challenge assumptions. 

Overview of the GCE A-Level Business Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 12Theme 1 Marketing and People
Students will develop an understanding of:

• meeting customer needs
• the market
• marketing mix and strategy managing people
• entrepreneurs and leaders.

Theme 4 Global Leaders
This theme develops the concepts introduced in Theme 1.
Students will develop an understanding of:

• globalisation
• global markets and business expansion
• global marketing
• global industries and companies (multinational corporations).
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management
Demonstrate knowledge of terms, concepts, theories, methods and models to show an understanding of how individuals and organisations are affected by and respond to business issues
Apply knowledge and understanding to various business contexts to show how individuals and organisations are affected by and respond to issues
Analyse issues within business, showing an understanding of the impact on individuals and organisations of external and internal influences
Evaluate qualitative and quantitative evidence to make informed judgements and propose evidence-based solutions to business issues
Visits to local and national business organisations to see how the theory is used in the real world.
Attend revision conferences to help with revision for the 3 exam papers.
Year 13Theme 2 Managing Business Activities
Students will develop an understanding of:

• raising finance
• financial planning
• managing finance
• resource management
• external influences.
Theme 3 Business decisions and strategy
This theme develops the concepts introduced in Theme 2. Students will develop an understanding of:
• business objectives and strategy
• business growth
• decision-making techniques
• influences on business decisions
• assessing competitiveness
• managing change.
• Ethical behaviour
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Relationship-building
• Adaptability
• Self-management

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Business:

Students must investigate different types and sizes of organisation in various business sectors and environments, and in local, national and global contexts.  They then have to develop their knowledge, skills and understanding in business, students need to have acquired competence in quantitative skills that are relevant to and applied in the business context that is supplied to them in the assessments. 

This course naturally builds upon the learning and skills development undertaken in KS4 with our GCSE Business course.  We start off with Theme 1 Marketing as it is contemporary and relevant, with lots of real examples we can draw upon in the news and the students’ life experiences as they are all already consumers and are impacted by marketing on a daily basis.  The natural progression is to then move onto Theme 4 Global business which naturally builds upon theme 1.

Year 12

Students begin the course from basic principles starting with an overview of the marketing process and why the subject is relevant in any business organisation.  We then move onto how this can be implemented on a global scale to create multinational companies.  We build knowledge of core business concepts and apply them to business contexts to develop a broad understanding of how businesses work.  Students then analyse and justify decisions based upon these scenarios.

Year 13

In Year 13 we build breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding, with applications to a wider range of contexts and more complex business information, which are developed in Themes 2 and 3, requiring students to take a more strategic view of business opportunities and issues. Students are encouraged to use an enquiring, critical and thoughtful approach to the study of business, to understand that business behaviour can be studied from a range of perspectives and to challenge assumptions. 

Steps that will be taken to ensure that students gain a broad and balanced knowledge within Business:

Time is spent in Year 12 and 13 building exam skills, particularly focusing on demonstrating knowledge of terms, concepts, theories, methods and models to show an understanding of how individuals and organisations are affected by and respond to business issues.  Students must apply knowledge and understanding to various business contexts to show how individuals and organisations are affected by and respond to issues.  Students have to analyse issues within business, showing an understanding of the impact on individuals and organisations of external and internal influences and finally they must evaluate qualitative and quantitative evidence to make informed judgements and propose evidence-based solutions to business issues 

GCSE (9-1) Computer Science Date: Jun 30, 2021
GCSE (9-1) Business Date: Jun 30, 2021