Creative Arts

Our Directors of Learning design sequences of lessons which combine with our Personal Development Programme delivered by Form Tutors. These closely align with our mission to ‘Teach What Matters’, a deliberate approach to ensure we address challenges that our students are likely to face and to give them the best possible chance of meeting their limitless potential. 
We want all Holyhead students to be able to;

  • Solve problems
  • Apply knowledge to the real world
  • Adapt to change and be resilient to failure
  • Be aware of their own thought processes and memory (metacognition)
  • Be articulate and express themselves
  • Think critically

We want all students at Holyhead to be strong in relation to the following attributes;

  • Leadership
  • Organisation
  • Resilience
  • Initiative
  • Communication

We also want them to recognise the best of human thinking and appreciate the fundamental British Values. 

Miss C Brandy

Director of Learning and Subject Leader of Drama

Mrs Y Geddes

Assistant Director of Learning for Creative Arts

Ms S Stafford

Subject Lead of Art & Design

Creative Arts is the soul of Holyhead School. The arts feeds into the cultural diversity of its local environment, developing character and nurturing students to show tolerance and passion for all aspects of the arts in the most expressive way. Our curriculum and our faculty is practical, hands on and interactive. We explore relevant topics, cultural currency and embed fundamental life long skills. We seek opportunities for the children we teach, both inside and outside of lessons, to ensure that our students get a full experience of the industry, the subjects and in turn, develop a love for music, dance, art and drama

Drama

Drama is a vital part of a student’s learning experience at Holyhead. It enables students the ability to communicate and work together. We believe in the holistic development of the child and so whilst it is important that students do improve and hone their performance skills, we place a lot of emphasis on the students developing skills for life. The curriculum has been developed to allow students to build their performance skills with the focus being very much on transferrable vocational skills. We want our students to be able to develop confidence and teamwork skills, fostering creativity and collaboration, as well as bringing their wider knowledge and experiences to the learning environment so that their identity, beliefs and values are confidently explored.

  • Drama encourages the exploration of the world we live in, in order to imitate experiences there needs an ability to listen well, observe, self reflect and discuss meaningful topics, stories and ideas
  • Have respect for others, ability to provide analytical feedback on yourself and of others to ensure high expectations are sustained
  • Teamwork and be able to collaborate
  • Ability to take direction as well as leading small group work
  • Use your initiative, being able to independently learn lines, make decisions and be reliable

What are the fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Drama?

The essence of Drama is to develop the students’ understanding and knowledge of subject specific techniques as well as nurture students’ confidence, communication, cooperation, concentration and performance skills; through the exploration of a broad range of current affairs and themes. Students also explore a range of theatre styles and practitioners in preparation for the BTEC Tech Award in Performing Arts (Acting). As well as devising their own performance material, students look at scripted plays and scene extracts alongside the work of theatre practitioners and grasp a good understanding of job roles within the performing arts industry. Our Drama curriculum has a huge focus on evaluation and oracy skills, where students are encouraged at every opportunity to assess their work and the work of their peers. This type of environment allows our students to become confident communicators and sets them up with transferable skills for the world of work.

Students will begin their Drama curriculum exploring the basic skills of performance, they will explore how to use their voice, body language, gesture and facial expressions . Students will be expected to imitate experiences they have either physically gone through or what they have viewed, this is to encourage empathy. They will go on to confidently being able to create drama based from a stimulus or a script.

Key Stage 3

  • Teaching what matters is at the forefront of the curriculum at KS3, therefore it is important the right content is taught to our students so they can identify the importance of drama and how it helps to allow many life experiences to be explored and learnt in a safe space.
  • Students have access to high quality performance work to help with modelling, to develop good evaluation in order to produce high quality performance work, this is to be revisited throughout all schemes of learning building on knowledge.
  • Reinforce the school’s Respect, Excellence and Responsibility values across all teaching and learning so that students understand what these areas look like and what is expected in order to have a positive learning experience.
Knowledge Attributes / CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 7Introduction to Drama 
Creating a character 
Different styles of theatre 
Scripted 
Creative process
SMSC
Responsibility 
Communication 
Confidence 
Respect 
Empathy
Learn to imitate real life through performance skills; facial expressions, vocal projection, body language and gesture.
Analysing and evaluation. 
Reading and emotion. 
Use of  basic techniques
Live performances 
Practical exploration of script and improvisation work 
Creative approach to mime and trestle theatre
Year 8Verbatim Theatre 
Brecht Vs Stanislavski
Script work
Responding to live theatre 
Creative Process
SMSC
Responsibility 
Communication 
Confidence 
British Values
Performance skills 
Abstract intention 
Evaluation and critical response
Devising, team work , use of techniques
Frantic assembly workshop – Physical Theatre 
Real life experiences/topics explored
Year 9Practitioners
Performance style 
Live theatre 
Creative process 
Devising from stimulus 
SMSC
Responsibility 
Communication 
Confidence 
British Values 
Performance skills 
Imaginative exploration of script and devising 
Analytical thinking
Theatre visit
Cross curricular across Creative Arts 
Real life scenarios explored

Year 7

As Drama is not part of the national curriculum, KS2 drama is taught widely as a secondary subject at primary and not taught as a single subject. The subject lends itself heavily on communication skills, team work, collaboration and many valuable life skills. When joining secondary school, we are fortunate at Holyhead to offer a drama curriculum that will encourage and build students character from the onset, students have the opportunity to safely create, perform and evaluate their work and of their peers. These are the 3 key areas we study across KS3, 4 and 5 – Create, Perform and Respond. Throughout Year 7, students will explore the use of their voice, body language , facial expressions and gestures; they are then encouraged to explore these skills within rehearsals and performance. Once students have understood how to use these skills with improvisation, they then start to look at the work of duologues based on scripts, this encourages creativity in a safe space by allowing students to work in pairs to develop confidence and for teacher assessment to be more focused on each student’s skills set at this stage. This work is then evaluated, where students are taught how to evaluate performance work and look at the importance of this. At Year 7 it’s heavily focused on oracy skills where we encourage the correct use of terminology and the ability to discuss and share ideas within confidence. Looking at WWW and EBI.

Once students have grasped the understanding of the basics of performance and how to evaluate they are then introduced to characterisation allowing them to challenge their vocal and movement skills. There is expectation for students to start imitating characters that are different to them, there is a high level expectation for deep thinking to enable this. Through the Autumn term students start to work with more students creating small groups pieces and understand how to structure a Drama piece. Students are taught how to use different techniques such as still images, flashbacks, cross cutting and mime, this is where we start to see creativity and more risks being taken in their choice of creating. In doing so this allows students to understand how different drama styles are created and performed. By the end of Year 7 students would have understood the basic elements of drama and performance, they would have understood a good level of techniques and skills that can be used to create a performance. The main performance style students should be able to identify are; duologue work, naturalism, mime, scripted and melodrama.

Year 8

Building on knowledge gained in Year 7, students continue to study; create, perform and respond. As students have a good understanding of the basic elements of performance, they now start to focus on two practitioners in some detail. This encourages the WHY, allowing students to explore, debate, discuss social, moral and ethical views on current affairs. In Year 8 students study Bertolt Brecht and Stanislavski. They start with Brecht, his work focuses on political theatre and social change. Students research Brecht’s theories and his basic principles used in performance, they then explore Verbatim theatre (performance style) and link this to current affairs taking place at the time, for example this might be Black Lives Matter. The content is crucially important as it gives the performance work and exploration meaning and motivation for our students. This style of work (Verbatim) is based on real life stories and allows students to understand the work of Brecht and how ideas can be communicated through drama in an effective way. During this scheme of learning students are taught how to research, edit, develop an understanding of empathy, inference skills and application to performance.

Students then go on to explore Stanislavski who is the comparison practitioner to Brecht this allows students to build on their Year 7 knowledge of naturalism. They start to learn and apply the basic elements of Stanislavski’s work to their improvised pieces. In Year 8 there is a broad balance of improvisation work which leads to devising, students look at scripts in some detail focusing on the performance side of it as to suppose the character and story analysis, which they would do in English. The Drama curriculum lends itself more on the emphasis of character relationships, staging styles, directing and use of techniques to enhance their performances for meaning.

A lot of professional work is viewed in Year 8 to develop students’ understanding of career opportunities, job roles within performing arts, the review of live theatre work encourages students curiosity and ability to evaluate their own work at greater depth,they are expected to write a written responses in some detail, looking at WWW and EBI, using the correct terminology.

At the end of Year 8 students study a creative process project where a lot of interleaving learning takes place and students have the ability to apply skills and techniques learnt from Year 7 through to 8 and apply the learning to the project. Students are assessed on creating, performing and responding.

Year 9

In Year 9 students are introduced to the BTEC Performing Arts specification. Students study plays in more detail looking at the analysis and understanding of text and the processes of creating the script extracts for performance. They are taught technical elements and performance elements linking them to suitable practitioners that were taught in Year 8.

There is a focus on research and what good research looks like, and how to use research for their work. This is in preparation for KS4, as there is big emphasis on the processes of creating performance work in Year 10.

Key Stage 4

The course is made up of three components: two that are internally assessed and one that’s externally assessed. Our three-block structure, explore, develop and apply, has been developed to allow students to build on and embed their knowledge. This allows them to grow in confidence and then put into practice what they have learned. Our assessment structure is also designed so that students can build on what they learn, and develop their skills, as they move through the course.

What are the fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in KS4 Performing Arts?

  • Students should be willing to progress and develop their performance skills following on from KS3
  • Students need to understand the purpose of research and know how to transfer skills and information to their work
  • Students need to be able to perform solo or part of an ensemble with any given roles or styles of performance
  • Students need to be able to use script or stimulus work to independently explore and create

We start off exploring three plays that are contrasting, this follows on from the Year 9 curriculum to allow students develop their understanding of how different plays are created. There is a higher expectation for students to start identifying interpretive skills both in the works of professionals and their own work. The plays studied give students the opportunity to gather a deeper understanding before going onto component 2 which expects students to apply skills to performance.

Year 10

Students start the course with Component 1: Explore. Students explore the processes used to create a performance.
They explore and further understand performance styles, creative intentions and purpose. They investigate how practitioners create and influence what’s performed, learn and discover performance roles, skills, techniques and processes that help to create the final piece.


This builds on their KS3 knowledge of scripts and understanding how they are explored and executed for performance.
Students study 3 comparison plays which are decided depending on the make of each cohort, for example, if we have students who express an interest in movement we will explore a physical theatre piece as part of the 3 plays, one year we may get a group of students who are more suited for comedy then we will study this style and 2 other comparison styles to ensure our students foster an interest and a broad knowledge and understanding of different styles of theatre. The flexibility of choice over plays is important as it will help to ensure the learning is meaningful and relevant.

Year 11

Students study Component 2 – Develop:
Students develop performance skills and techniques by reproducing existing performances.
During Component 2, our students will take part in workshops, taught classes and assessed rehearsals, they will gain physical, interpretative, vocal and rehearsal skills. Students work towards applying these skills in performance and reflect on their progress, their performance and how they could improve. These skills are taught right from KS3 and beyond, ensuring that there is both continuity, but also the ability to build on prior learning.
Component 3: Apply. Students pull together all they have learned and apply their knowledge in a performance, this type of learning is taught at the end of Years 8&9 and is developed again in Year 10.

  • Coursework split into three clear learning aims with short assessment deadlines for each learning aim
  • Regular viewing of live work and facilitators visiting, to encourage students confidence in communications skills for research purposes
  • Students keep building on their prior knowledge from KS3

Key Stage 5

The BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Performing Arts is designed to give creative and innovative vocational opportunities for learners wanting to progress to higher education, an apprenticeship or employment. The combination of mandatory content and optional units means that the qualification in Performing Arts can be tailored to suit all sector needs from acting and dance, to musical theatre and community-focused projects. All of the mandatory units can be delivered as a specialist route or across a broader discipline.

What are the fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in BTEC Level 3 Performing Arts?

  • Students need to be confident in performance skills and willing to develop their skills throughout the course
  • Students need to be able to identify different repertoire styles and the work of at least two practitioners
  • Students need to understand what devising is and be able to use their imagination to help explore ideas
  • While in KS5 students are expected to compare and contrast three repertoires in detail, students should be able to do this in greater detail with the use of research to support their ideas

Year 12

Two units are studied in Year 12 that focus on developing critical analysis skills. They give learners the opportunity to undertake research into influential practitioners, relevant to their interests, whose performance work and ideas may engage and inspire them.

During Unit 1, will research contextual factors and identify how these influence the creation of work for performance. This equips students for the external unit they will study. Throughout Unit 1 students will watch and analyse live and recorded productions as well as finding information in books, journals, newspapers and magazines and online. This is a synoptic unit and it is important that interleaving learning from KS4 is repeated, students are encouraged to consider their exploration of practitioners’ repertoire in other units and use this to consolidate and/or inspire their investigation. The external assessment requires learners to carry out research into two practitioners’ work. The content covered in this unit requires students to develop their research skills and writing skills in preparation for the external assessment.

Year 13

The externally assessed unit provides opportunities for students to draw on their individual practical performance skills and demonstrate an understanding of the methods and techniques for creating performance in order to contribute to the making and realisation of new performance material. Students will work in small groups to create an original performance piece in response to a stimulus provided in the external assignment briefing. Students will demonstrate their understanding of selecting appropriate strategies and techniques they may identify when exploring how to respond to the stimulus in order to create an inspiring and unique piece of theatre. The emphasis of the unit is on exploration and development of original performance material and the selection and application of appropriate performance skills. Learners will devote much of the unit therefore to experimenting with devising and/or choreographic methods, and using discussion, improvisation, staging and compositional techniques to put together a short performance in which they will ‘try out’ their creative intentions and ideas to an invited audience.

  • Familiarising learners with ways of responding to different stimuli
  • Equip students with a practical vocabulary of working methods to create performance
  • Students will be familiar with directing/choreography, staging techniques and rehearsal processes from work in other units
  • Students need to confidently prepare a skills audit, using self-assessment and peer-assessment when considering their strengths and contribution to a working ensemble

Music

Holyhead’s music curriculum enables students to develop fundamental music skills on a variety of instruments from ukulele, African Djembe, Samba to keyboard skills, all through the practical engagement and experiencing of music, developing students’ natural musical instincts. Our curriculum allows us to develop students’ awareness of culture, history and development of music overtime as well as music technology. As well as this, students develop performance skills and listening skills, learning the importance of performance, how to engage an audience as well as how to critically analyse their own and others performances. Music at Holyhead not only promotes a key development of character, but also allows students to solve problems through exploring musical instruments and the analysis of music.

Key skills of a musician:

  • Listening and appraising – The ability to listen and identify instruments, styles, genres and rhythm/pitch/ key signature and notation analysis
  • Performance – The ability to perform confidently to a higher ability
  • Composition – The ability to compose through music technology including the remixing, film composition, game composing and organising sound through technology
  • Teamwork – The ability to lead, support and work with others, confidently share ideas but most importantly support others
  • Independent working skills – To be able to manage own work, rehearsals and planning time to improve personal targets.

Key Stage 3

Overview of the KS3 Curriculum:

KnowledgeAttributes/CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 7• Instrumental skills keyboard, ukulele
• Technique on instruments
• Understanding culture of music genres such as Samba, Western classical, West end musicals
• Composition
• Remixing
• Performance
This curriculum allows students to develop performance skills, enabling students to become more confident in public speaking. This in hand supports students’ ability to work with and support others.
• Cultural capital
• SMSC
• Instrumental skills
• Composition skills
• Analysis skills
• Group work skills
• Visiting Artists
• Independant listening
• Studio visits
• Performances within theatres
• Performances within school
Year 8• Instrumental skills keyboard, Djembes, drumkit, bands
• Technique on instruments
• Understanding culture of music genres such as Samba, Western classical, West end musicals
• Composition
• Performance
• Analysis
This curriculum allows students to develop performance skills, enabling students to become more confident in public speaking. This in hand supports students’ ability to work with and support others. 
• Cultural Capital
• SMSC
• Instrumental skills
• Composition skills
• Analysis skills
• Group work skills
• Visiting Artists
• Independant listening
• Studio visits
• Performances within theatres
• Performances within school
Year 9• Instrumental skills- band and keyboard
• Careers in music
• Composition
• Analysis of music/ critique
This curriculum allows students to develop performance skills, enabling students to become more confident in public speaking. This in hand supports students’ ability to work with and support others. 
• Cultural Capital 
• SMSC
• Instrumental skills
• Composition skills
• Analysis skills
• Group work skills
• Visiting Artists
• Independant listening
• Studio visits
• Performances within theatres
• Performances within school

What are the fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in KS3 Music?

Students need to acquire basic skills on instruments, specifically to be able to play rhythmically on percussion, or play basic melodies and chord progressions on keyboards/ guitars/ ukuleles or another instrument of their choice (including voice).

Students will also need to have skills to enable them to work with groups of students as a band as well as a solo instrumentalist/ singer.

Students will need to be able to self reflect, set targets and work independently through them using rehearsal processes.

Students will begin their music curriculum looking at keyboard skills through classical music. This will enable them to understand the fundamental parts of the keyboard and how to play basic melody. This will then lead to them performing it with a peer. It is vital that students are able to explore music through doing. And through developing keyboard skills as the first topic within music, we are able to ensure that students’ strengths and experiences are assessed, and that students are able to either learn and develop a new skill or extend previous keyboard experiences further, developing their confidence and challenging their musical ability.

As well as this students begin to look at music technology. Focussing on record labels and how the music industry is made up. This allows students to gain an understanding of how music works, where it comes from and the vital history that can be found around the music they listen to each day.

Year 7

Music is something shared from early childhood through singing, rhythm and play. Though it is difficult to determine what music experience all children have had from primary school, generally speaking most students have already experienced rhythm through clapping, song or even percussion instruments right through to melody through song. From this point, it is vital for us to move onto developing techniques within these areas. This can mean correct finger technique right through to being able to play and hold a rhythm over a cross rhythm, metronome beat and even being able to identify and read notation and tab. From this basis we are able to then develop other musical skills such as performance and composition. As well as this students will be aware of some key elements of music, giving students the fundamental building blocks to create and compose within the topic they are studying, whether that be through Samba, improvisation, music technology, keyboard skills, classical composition or advert music. This all links directly to the requirements of the National Curriculum, where students should have experienced composition and performance through the act of doing and learning about the diverse culture and history of music.

Year 8

To continue to develop our KS3 students, we now explore these areas and themes introduced in Year 7 in much more detail, most specifically through the introduction of music technology composition. This enables students to explore composition through technology and allows students to gain an understanding of how music can be used in film, advert and in day to day life. In order to continue to develop their learning from both Year 7 and KS2, we also begin to introduce more techniques into their learning. This is achieved through introducing the ukulele; a different form of notation and playing, as well as more complex rhythmical patterns through African Djembe, as well as continuing to build their knowledge on keyboard skills through introducing more complex notation such as chord progressions and accidentals. This allows us to then scaffold composition allowing a much more complex understanding of how to compose and select chords and melody lines. Throughout Year 8 students continue to develop in terms of the required elements of the National Curriculum, but extending their music theory knowledge, listening, appraising and performance skills.

Year 9

Throughout year 9 we will build upon students’ prior knowledge through introducing students to blues, with a focus on developing their improvisation skills that will now allow them to embed improvisation and technique into not only their compositions, but also their performances. As well as this, students will continue (in conjunction with the NC) to develop their listening and appraising skills, allowing them to identify the key elements of music in terms of style, genre, tempo, dynamics, and timbre our key elements of music which have been embedded since KS2.

Key Stage 4

Overview of the KS4 Curriculum:

KnowledgeAttributes/CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 10• Genres of music
• Exploring the origins of genres
• Developing rehearsal skills as a group
• Developing performance skills as a group
• Developing instrumental skills as a group
• Exploring instrumental techniques as a soloist
• Understanding maintenance and use of instrument
• Understanding how to self reflect, set targets and improve on instruments.
Students are able to explore performance through a variety of genres of music.

This introduces cultural awareness

Links to SMSC
• Instrumental skills
• Analysis skills
• Listening skills
• Exploration and research skills
• Evaluation skills
• Visiting artist
• Performing opportunities
• Trips and visits
• Internal instrumental lessons
• Extra-curricular clubs
Year 11• Developing musical ensemble skills within a short time frame
• Developing performance skills
• Developing rehearsal skills
• Self and Peer reflection
• Planning and organising events
• Health and safety
Students are able to explore performance through a variety of genres of music.

This introduces cultural awareness

Links to SMSC
• Instrumental skills
• Analysis skills
• Listening skills
• Exploration and research skills
• Evaluation skills
• Live music events
• Visiting artist
• Performing opportunities
• Trips and visits
• Internal instrumental lessons
• Extra-curricular clubs

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Music:

  • Students need to have a high level of experience on at least one instrument (including voice)
  • Students need to be able to perform confidently on their instrument to a large audience. Must have the capacity to work as a group
  • Students must be able to critique their own and others’ work, as well as understand the safety requirements needed in order to successfully put on a concert or event

At the beginning of the course, we introduce the students to a variety of genres of music. This is to enable students to expand on their knowledge of music genres. This also introduces the students to their first assignment, where they are to compare and contrast two genres of music. It is vital for them to not only understand genres of music through research and written work. But also to feel and perform music from different genres also.  This also allows them to then move on to develop their own musicianship through setting targets, gaining feedback and working towards an end performance.

Year 10

The students are gradually introduced to the topics they will study throughout their examination years by firstly exploring genres of music, and then moving on to using these experiences and the contrasting genres to develop, plan and perform their own sets for their external assessments. Through the development of deeping skills on instruments through instrumental lessons, rigorous practice and self-reflection. Students will now add depth in terms of level and ability of pieces they are performing. Students will also have more challenges in terms of showcases they organise. They will also now use skills from music technology to select and choose units that are suitable for their own skills.

Year 11

In year 11 the students have now gained the experiences they need to enable them to plan and prepare their own concerts and analyse health and safety. Through their exploration of genres in year 10, they are now able to select an appropriate repertoire for their own performances. This academic year within music is very student-led. The tutor will be watching for musician qualities and this is developed from year 10 all the way through to year 11. 

Key skills of a musician:

  • Performance skills
  • Analysis of own and other performance
  • Research skills
  • Evaluation skills
  • Constand re affirming of technique on instruments and the importance of it
  • Visually watching and listening to live bands and performances
  • Engaging in music across the world
  • Feeling and experiencing the differences between genres.

Key Stage 5

We aim to ensure that all students are taught…

Rockschool Level 3 Music Practitioners

Overview of the KS5 Curriculum:

KnowledgeAttributes/CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 12/13• Instrumental skills
• Teaching, sharing knowledge skills
• Performance
• Organising performances for others
• Planning live events
• Developing performance, rehearsal evaluative skills
• Selecting own repertoire
• Understanding fundamental aspects of the music industry and how it has developed over time
This curriculum expects students to refine performance skills, enabling students to become more confident in large scale performances.

• Cultural capital
• SMSC
• Leadership
• Organisational skills
• Communication
• Performance
• Composition
• Analysis
• Critique
• Performances
• Recording studios
• Trips
• Organising trips and events
• Teaching and leading others
• Visiting artists

What are the fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in KS5 Music?

Students need to be independent and be able to lead and support others both in terms of an ensemble, but also as a teacher to lower school children. Organising time is key in this subject as you are responsible for your own coursework and deadlines. Students will need to be skilled on their instruments and able to perform with confidence alone. Students will need to self-reflect, set targets and improve over set periods of time. 

Students begin with performance. Developing a new group can take time. Students will be set challenging to work in alternate genres, time signatures in order to stretch and challenge their performance ability. Students also look at careers in music in order to enable them to consider what skills and options they have for their university applications.

Throughout music, you are able to develop your skills through song choice and performance opportunities. Through adjusting the genre of music you are able to add additional challenges. As students progress through the course they will plan more and more live events, which in itself adds additional challenges. This can include the roles and careers that can be found within the music industry. Students will continue to develop their ability to work as an ensemble. Developing their ability to perform through lead sheet, notation or learning to play pieces by ear.

What key steps will be taken to ensure that students gain a broad and balanced knowledge within Music?

  • Performance skills
  • Analysis of own and other performance
  • Research skills
  • Evaluation skills
  • Constand re affirming of technique on instruments and the importance of it
  • Visually watching and listening to live bands and performances
  • Engaging in music across the world
  • Feeling and experiencing the differences between genres.