Health & Wellbeing

Directors of Learning design sequences of lessons which combine with our Personal Development Programme delivered by Form Tutors. These closely align with our mission to ‘Teach What Matters’, a deliberate approach to ensure we address challenges that our students are likely to face and to give them the best possible chance of meeting their limitless potential. 

We want all Holyhead students to be able to;

  • Solve problems
  • Apply knowledge to the real world
  • Adapt to change and be resilient to failure
  • Be aware of their own thought processes and memory (metacognition)
  • Be articulate and express themselves
  • Think critically

We want all students at Holyhead to be strong in relation to the following attributes;

  • Leadership
  • Organisation
  • Resilience
  • Initiative
  • Communication

We also want them to recognise the best of human thinking and appreciate the fundamental British Values.  

Mrs C Gill

Director of Learning for Health & Wellbeing

Mrs L Mckinney

Subject Leader for Food & Nutrition and Child Development

Mr M Mills

Health & Wellbeing Head of Boys’ for Physical Education

Health and Wellbeing are at the forefront of all learning. It aims to prepare students for life beyond school, providing them with the knowledge to make informed decisions about aspects of lifestyle, which can have a positive or negative effect both now and in the future. 

Through Physical Education, Food and Nutrition and Child Development,  students will receive a varied programme of learning which will develop the knowledge and understanding of the four aspects of health – Physical, Mental, Emotional and Social.   This programme will support the need for a healthy diet and lifestyle, and the ability to make informed choices based on the findings from a local initiative called “Creating a Healthy Food City” in which references are made to rising cases of obesity and health concerns in Birmingham,  including reduced life expectancy. 

The initial stage in the fight against obesity is equipping our students with the skills, knowledge and understanding of how to adopt a healthy lifestyle, including how to prepare, cook and eat healthier food, in addition to cultural and religious diversity.  Alongside this, students also need to understand the importance of exercise, and the positive effects it has on health.  They need guidance and support in accessing facilities within their own local areas such as the local parks and leisure centres, the aim being to get young people active and make the most of the opportunities available to them.   The fundamental overarching aim of the Health and Wellbeing faculty’s curriculum is to help to produce a generation of students from Holyhead who will inspire future generations to adopt healthier, active lifestyles, ensuring that Health and Wellbeing are at the core of all learning.  Our students face many barriers.  The role of our faculty is to empower children to overcome them and teach what matters! 

Physical Education

Our physical education curriculum has a holistic approach, which develops students’ knowledge, understanding, skills, and the physical attributes required for mental, emotional, social and physical wellbeing. It offers students opportunities to succeed and excel in competitive sport and other physically demanding activities.  

It allows students to become physically and cognitively competent through a wide range of sporting activities in a way that supports their health and wellbeing needs.  PE has a responsibility to promote character and help to embed core values such as Respect, Excellence and Responsibility.  Furthermore, students learn through theoretical approaches, learning of the importance of how to live and maintain a healthy and active lifestyle. 

We aim to ensure that all students…

  • Develop the competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities 
  • Are physically active for sustained periods of time 
  • Engage in competitive sports and activities
  • Understand the importance of leading healthy, active lifestyles
  • Develop the ability to work with others, and adopt leadership roles
  • Gain an understanding of sport culture, records, statistics, politics, and the wider world of sport
  • Use advanced skills independently or in combination with others to achieve high performance outcomes within individual practices, conditioned games and/or competitive scenarios 
  • Have extensive knowledge and understanding of how to apply tactics/strategies to outwit an opponent(s)
  • Effectively analyse own and others performance(s), recognising strengths, and understanding areas requiring improvement
  • Prepare for and recover from exercise safely and effectively understanding the principles used, recognising the benefits of regular exercise and the benefits of being active
  • Have developed effective communication and decision making skills
  • Adopt a variety of roles within a range of sports

Food and Nutrition

Food and Nutrition in our school will equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating. Our curriculum will encourage students to cook and enable them to make informed decisions about a wide range of further learning opportunities and career pathways as well as develop vital life skills that enable them to feed themselves and others affordably and nutritiously, now and later in life.

Through food and nutrition, students will:

  • Demonstrate effective and safe cooking skills by planning, preparing and cooking using a variety of food commodities, cooking techniques and equipment
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties and chemical processes as well as the nutritional content of food and drinks
  • Understand the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, including the physiological and psychological effects of poor diet and health
  • Understand the economic, environmental, ethical, and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, and diet and health choices
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of functional and nutritional properties, sensory qualities and microbiological food safety considerations when preparing, processing, storing, cooking and serving food
  • Understand and explore a range of ingredients and processes from different culinary traditions reflecting the rich multicultural heritage of our students, to inspire new ideas or modify existing recipes.

The key skills for a student in Food & Nutrition:

  • Be able to demonstrate relevant and comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the concepts, principles and properties of food science, cooking and nutrition
  • Safely and effectively apply precise and sophisticated technical skills when using a wide range of equipment and ingredients to plan, prepare and present complex dishes
  • Critically analyse and evaluate, to draw well-evidenced conclusions
  • Discuss and evaluate Issues relating to food choices, provenance and production of food made by themselves and others.

Key Stage 3

We aim to ensure that all students are taught…

Physical Education

We aim to provide a high-quality physical education curriculum that inspires all pupils to succeed and excel in competitive sport and other physically demanding activities. We strive to provide opportunities for pupils to become physically confident in a way that supports their health and fitness. Students will have opportunities to compete in sport and other activities, to build character and help embed values such as fairness and respect.  

Overview of the KS3 Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 7• Developing Skills/Performance
• Teamwork
• Knowledge of Playing Positions
• Basic Rules
• Making Informed Choices about Healthy Active Lifestyles
• Leadership
• Organisation
• Resilience
• Initiative
• Communication
• Respect
• Sportsmanship
• Throwing
• Catching
• Passing/Receiving
• Defending/Attacking
• Movement
• Creation of Space
• Sports specific skills
• Warm up and cool down effectively
• Extra-curricular clubs
• Inter-college competitions
• Representing the school in competitive fixtures against other schools
• Trips to professional sports events/fixtures
Year 8• Developing Skills/Performance
• Using tactics/strategies to outwit opponent(s)
• Evaluating and Improving
• Making and Applying Decisions
• Leadership
• Organisation
• Resilience
• Initiative
• Communication
• Respect
• Sportsmanship
• Attacking/Defending
• Problem Solving
• Tactical Awareness
• Warm up and cool down effectively
• Self/Peer Assessment
• Extra-curricular clubs
• Representing the school in competitive fixtures against other schools
Year 9 • Ability to complete student-led tasks
• Ability to use diagrams and instructions to construct learning zones
• Leadership
• Organisation
• Resilience
• Initiative
• Communication
• Respect
• Verbal/nonverbal Communication
• Problem Solving
• Tactical decision making
• Extra-curricular clubs
• Representing the school in competitive fixtures against other schools
• Trips to professional sports events/fixtures

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Physical Education:

Students need to:

  • Develop core skills such as running, jumping, balance
  • Develop hand/eye coordination – This affects all actions in sport whether it’s throwing/catching, kicking, striking, shooting etc. 
  • Use a range of tactics and strategies to overcome opponents in direct competition through team and individual games (for example, badminton, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders, rugby and tennis)  
  • Take part in activities which present intellectual and physical challenges and be encouraged to work in a team, building on trust and developing skills to solve problems, either individually or as a group  
  • Analyse their performances compared to previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best 
  • Develop an understanding of how to lead healthy, active lives.

In Year 7, students will build on and embed further the physical development and skills learned in Key Stages 1 and 2. They will learn to become more competent, confident and expert in their techniques, and be able to apply them across different sports and physical activities. They will develop an understanding of what makes a performance effective and how to apply these principles to their own and others’ work. They will develop the confidence and interest to get involved in exercise, sports and activities out of school and in later life, and understand and apply the long-term health benefits of physical activity.  In year 7 students will take part in Gymnastics – where they will begin to develop their knowledge and understanding of the different components of fitness, and they will continue to develop the ability to control their body, which will be required for a range of sports in KS3 and 4.  Students will also take part in team sports such as netball, football, hockey and tag rugby, where their core skills will be assessed and built on, as these skills will also be required and developed further throughout KS3 and 4.  Students can also consolidate these skills further by taking part in extracurricular sports which will be offered throughout their school career.

Year 7

In the Autumn term, students are taught Gymnastics, Football, Hockey and Netball.

  • Gymnastics is taught in the autumn term to encourage creativity, independent, and paired learning. Students will learn to control their body, understand the importance of body tension and fluency in sport, whilst developing their core strength. Gymnastics will challenge students to move out of their comfort zone, develop an understanding of aesthetics and how to perform.  It will also develop and improve students’ leadership, observation and evaluation skills. These skills can then be transferred and applied to other sports in the curriculum.
  • Football is delivered early in the year to allow students to start with a sport that is familiar to them and which allows them to express themselves. It provides an opportunity for students to get to know each other and develop their ability to work effectively in a team situation.  Students are taught how to pass and control the ball. This provides an opportunity to use students who are already competent, and can demonstrate leadership and communication skills. In later lessons shooting, dribbling and defending are delivered using similar methods.
  • Hockey is delivered in the Autumn term to girls and in Spring term to boys. Students will be taught the basic skills of dribbling, passing, shooting and defending to build on previously learnt skills from KS2.  The principles of invasion games will be introduced and the concepts of attacking and defending. Links between different sports will be made in terms of the use of tactics, despite the skills being very different.
  • Netball is delivered in the Autumn term and the main focus in year 7 is the development of the foundation skills of passing (using the chest, bounce and overhead pass), and understanding when to use this type of pass effectively and successfully in a competitive situation. Students will be able to build on previous skills learnt at KS2. Students will also learn and recap the basic rules, including footwork, obstruction, contact and offside, and apply these in a game situation. Students will begin to develop more tactical awareness in the game, and some will consolidate this by joining the school netball team, and competing for the school. 

Basketball, Tag Rugby, Cricket, Rounders and Athletics are taught across the Spring and Summer terms.

  • Basketball is taught in the Spring term, and students will build on previously learnt fundamental motor skills (throwing and catching, dribbling) which will be taught throughout the unit. Basketball promotes individual expression within a team sport. Through basketball we start to introduce year 8 concepts such as tactics, roles and positions that are used in other team sports.
  • Tag Rugby is delivered to the girls in the Spring term.  Students will be taught the core skills of passing and receiving in rugby using the pop and lateral pass.  They will develop an understanding of the rules of passing, which is vital to the success of the game. They will be taught the concept of defence and attack, tactical formations (holding a defensive line, and maintaining an attacking line).
  • In Cricket and Rounders, students are introduced to the basic skills of throwing and catching using different techniques (underarm/overarm). Following on from this, students will learn the correct bowling and batting technique and will develop their decision making ability in striking and fielding sports. These units are taught in the summer term to avoid heat or energy exhaustion from students who are fasting, and to maintain high levels of engagement across the term.In Athletics 1, students are taught a range of track events including the sprint start, sprint technique, pacing and relay. Each event will be broken down into stages so that students can learn, practice and improve the correct technique. Students will use success criteria to observe, evaluate, and provide feedback on performance. Students can reinforce their learning further by attending Athletics Club.  Students have the opportunity to represent the school in Sports Day and the Aston School’s Athletics Competition.

Year 8

  • Basketball – students will build on previously learnt skills, develop an understanding of tactics, and use these in competitive situations. Tasks will include more student led and problem solving. Students will understand the links between positions, body types and individual attributes when playing in a specific position. 
  • Football – students will use previously learnt skills and apply them to set scenarios. Students will be introduced to a range of positions within smaller sided games, and will work together collaboratively to create, plan and execute game plans and formations.
  • Netball – students will recap and build on the key skills/concepts and rules learnt previously. They will continue to develop their knowledge and understanding of the different positions and the use of tactics to outwit an opponent. Students will learn the principles of attack (how to get free from a player, create space and attacking opportunities), and defensive play (how to effectively mark a player, and defend the ball and space). 
  • Hockey – students will build on previously learnt skills and knowledge by increasing the complexity and variety of skills, such as attacking drives, use of width during games and shooting techniques. Offensive and defensive tactics will be introduced and applied to small sided games to outwit opponents.  
  • Fitness – students will take part in a variety of fitness activities such as circuit training and aerobics. They will explore different training methods such as continuous, fartlek and types of sprints.  They will take part in fitness tests such as the Multistage Fitness Test, the Step up Test, and the Illinois Agility test.  Students will develop their knowledge of components of fitness, and an understanding of how the fitness activities and training methods can improve their fitness levels.
  • Badminton – Introduction to racket sports. Students learn the basics of grip, serving and different types of shot, both offensive and defensive. Emphasis is on outwitting an opponent 1v1, and dominating the space on court. Students will learn the rules and scoring system of the game.
  • Cricket – students will develop previously learnt skills such as adding speed, spin and delivery angle/bounce (bowling), use of defensive and attacking shots (batting), use of formations (fielding).
  • Rounders – students will continue to improve their individual skills through practice, and combine with the use of tactics in a game (batting the ball into space/specific directions), (fielding – vary the type of bowl to beat the batter – fast/spin/donkey drop, bowler/backstop/first post tactic, backstop to 2nd post tactic, fielding positions). Students will continue to improve their understanding of the rules and scoring system.

Year 9

  • Handball – Students will use knowledge learned within basketball lessons but applying the basic skills in a different way. The rules of handball are interchangeable from basketball with the introduction of new rules and a focus on attack and defence. There will be an increased focus on officiating and leadership.
  • Athletics 2 – students will develop an understanding of how technique is critical to perform to a high level. Students will make connections from events to concepts such as trajectory, power, speed and velocity. They will use cross curricular links with maths, science, english, history,  ICT skills, key words, concepts and activities to broaden understanding of each event (javelin, shot put, discus, long jump, high jump, triple jump). Students will learn to use data to judge performance and apply recommendations on how to improve performance via analysis techniques – iPad, written, measuring distances etc. 
  • Badminton – students will learn and build on their prior knowledge of a range of shots (forehand/backhand/overhead,short and long serve), and learn to use tactics when using shot choice to impact their opponents’ use of space, being able to win points consistently in individual and paired play. Develop knowledge of the rules of Badminton.
  • Rugby – students will develop an understanding how the use of a pop or lateral pass when combined with timing can create space or territory advancing opportunities. Understand off ball movement (attacking line or defensive line). Use tactics to overcome an opponent(s).
  • Softball – students will use and transfer skills previously used in cricket (batting, bowling, fielding – throwing/catching, ground fielding) but in a different format. Use of tactics to get others out. More collaboration in use of batting order, fielding positions, batting decisions, bowling tactics.  

Alternative sports – Introduce various alternative sports from around the world. Students will need to use the knowledge they have learned from other sports to play different sports. Students are required to work out how to play the game as well as how to officiate and how to be successful in it.  Students will get the opportunity to experience Garlic Football, Danish Longball, Korfball, American Football, Coneball, Aussie Rules Football, Dodgeball and Ultimate Frisbee.  The Alternative sport unit is used to widen students’ knowledge on sports from around the world, rules and regulations and how culture/history has influenced modern sports/activities.

  • Medium term plans will break down lessons for each sport/activity, and these will be sequenced in order and built towards how to play a sport, e.g cricket = throwing & catching, ground fielding, bowling, batting (within small sided games).
  • Core skills and specific knowledge will be assessed and built upon using a range of sports and activities.
  • Sports will be revisited to build on skills and expand technical and tactical ability.

Sports will be consolidated by providing extracurricular clubs which will enable students to build on what they know, extend their technical knowledge further, and allow them to apply this in competitive situations.  

Food & Nutrition

Food and Nutrition in our school will equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating. Our curriculum will encourage students to cook and enable them to make informed decisions about a wide range of further learning opportunities and career pathways as well as develop vital life skills that enable them to feed themselves and others affordably and nutritiously, now and later in life.

Overview of the KS3 Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 7• Hygiene and Safety
• Nutrition
• Food commodities
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Organisation
• Communication
• To describe, explain and use hygienic and safe practices in Food & Nutrition.
• Evaluate the nutritional value of food making reference to macro and micro nutrients and their role in the diet.
• Have a basic awareness of the origin of some foods
• Develop a range of basic food preparation techniques and be able to prepare a selection of healthy dishes that are predominantly savoury.
Practical sessions are taught with all ingredients provided allowing opportunity for all students to cook.
Year 8• Eatwell guide (recap)
• International foods
• Food commodities
• Food science
• Food provenance
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Organisation
• Communication
Develop an increasing range of basic food preparation techniques and be able to prepare a greater selection of healthy dishes that are predominantly savoury.• Extra-curricular clubs
• Representing the school in competitive fixtures against other schools
Year 9 • Nutrition
• Diet & Health
• Factors affecting food choice
• Specialist diets
• Food Spoilage and contamination
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Organisation
• Respect
• Communication
Continually develop a range of food preparation techniques and be able to prepare a variety of healthy dishes that are predominantly savoury.

Through food and nutrition, students will:

  • Demonstrate effective and safe cooking skills by planning, preparing and cooking using a variety of food commodities, cooking techniques and equipment
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties and chemical processes as well as the nutritional content of food and drinks
  • Understand the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, including the physiological and psychological effects of poor diet and health
  • Understand the economic, environmental, ethical, and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, and diet and health choices
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of functional and nutritional properties, sensory qualities and microbiological food safety considerations when preparing, processing, storing, cooking and serving food
  • Understand and explore a range of ingredients and processes from different culinary traditions reflecting the rich multicultural heritage of our students, to inspire new ideas or modify existing recipes. 

The key skills for students in Food and Nutrition are:

  • Be able to demonstrate relevant and comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the concepts, principles and properties of food science, cooking and nutrition
  • Safely and effectively apply precise and sophisticated technical skills when using a wide range of equipment and ingredients to plan, prepare and present complex dishes
  • Critically analyse and evaluate, to draw well-evidenced conclusions
  • Discuss and evaluate Issues relating to food choices, provenance and production of food made by themselves and others.

KS3 Curriculum Intent:

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Food & Nutrition:

Students will need to have a secure understanding of food hygiene and safety to ensure that they work this way during practicals,  but also that they understand the implications of not doing so in their own homes and when they eat out.

Students will need to develop a repertoire of basic food preparation skills to be able to prepare a range of complex dishes in the food preparation element of GCSE. 

Without a thorough understanding of nutrition, students will not be able to apply the principles when menu planning and justifying dush choices for specific groups. Students will need to be able to evaluate the practical work done by themselves and that of others using sensory descriptors in order to suggest improvements.

Food and Nutrition are taught under the Design and Technology umbrella at many primary schools where food is delivered amongst other subjects such as resistant materials and textiles, therefore, their experience of food preparation has been limited to very basic things such as sandwiches and cupcakes. Most of this work is also done in groups therefore not providing opportunities for independent learning. We build on what little has been done to create independent competent practical workers with a secure knowledge of the foundations for food preparation and nutrition through both theory and practical tasks.

Year 7

Students come to Holyhead with varying levels of experience in Food and Nutrition. A key element of the subject is the ability to not only work in a safe and hygienic manner to protect themselves and those around them, but also understand the implications of failing to do so.  Students are introduced to a range of equipment that will be utilised within practical lessons meaning they are able to identify and understand the functions in readiness for independent planning and practical work. We introduce students to the topic of nutrition to allow them to link it to not only their own food choice but also that of the food commodities that they study later within the year. Food commodities not only give an insight into the nutritional value of foods and their role in a balanced diet but also the different preparation and cooking methods. In practical lessons, students start with basic food preparation skills and techniques that are then built up in an attempt to create independent cooks. 

Year 8

It is important to start any year group with a recap on the key elements that contribute towards maintaining a balanced diet and initiatives in place to support this, so a reference is made back to the Eatwell guide, including its intention and purpose. The foods around the world topics allow students to understand what factors influence a country’s cuisine and also gain an understanding of how events in the past and technology have led to changes in food availability, accessibility and affordability. Students are introduced to food science within Year 8 to help them to better understand how science is used to develop new food products, improve food systems and protect the integrity and safety of the global food supply chain (environmental aspects).  

Year 9

During Year 9 we build on the basic knowledge gained in Year 7 and 8 with regards to nutrition and healthy eating and develop it further with a view to students being able to understand the importance when meal planning for specific groups. The functions and sources of particular nutrients inform students even further when evaluating the needs of those people who may have health conditions, personal references or religious beliefs affecting their food choice. Food spoilage and contamination remain key principles taught across all key stages and further support the work covered at GCSE level in terms of knowing how food contamination occurs at the sources, and furthermore how it can be prevented in both the purchase, storage, preparation and cooking of foods. Regular implementation and securing the knowledge surrounding these key aspects also ensures the correct practice is followed during any practical lessons that students undertake.

Throughout the KS3 curriculum, students are building knowledge incrementally which means that content is regularly revisited and interleaved amongst most aspects of the schemes – students are repeatedly having to draw upon long term schemas to support learning current knowledge. 

Key Stage 4

We aim to ensure that all students are taught…

Physical Education

KS4 Curriculum Intent:

OCR Level 2 Certificate in Sports Studies

The OCR Cambridge National Level 2 Certificate in Sport is a vocational course that is designed to give students the opportunity to learn the theoretical components of sport through a combination of practical and theory lessons. The Certificate is equivalent to 1 GCSE and students will be awarded a pass, merit or distinction grade.  The course is structured through 4 different units that all focus on a variety of topics related to sport.  The course provides a broad, solid foundation for progression to Level 3 and employment in the sports sector.   Students will have the opportunity to develop personal, learning and thinking skills (PLTS) within a sector-related context.  The OCR Cambridge in Sports Studies also provides further opportunities to enhance and reinforce skills in English and Mathematics in naturally occurring, relevant, work-related contexts.

The course will suit students who are interested in sport and who would like to deepen their knowledge in all aspects of sport. It leads well into further courses in sport, for example, A-level Sport or a Level 3 Sport qualification. The course also promotes a variety of core skills such as the confidence to lead presentations, sports activities as well as developing ICT skills.

Overview of the KS4 Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 10• Know the personal qualities, styles, roles and responsibilities associated with effective sports leadership
• Be able to plan sports activity sessions
• Be able to deliver sports activity sessions
• Be able to evaluate own performance in delivering a sports activity session
• Be able to use skills, techniques and tactics/strategies/compositional ideas as an individual performer in a sporting activity
• Be able to use skills, techniques and tactics/strategies/ compositional ideas as a team performer in a sporting activity.
• Be able to officiate in a sporting activity
• Be able to apply practice methods to support improvement in a sporting activity – LO4a – types of skill – LO4b – types of practice.
• Organisation
• Time management
• Leadership
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Confidence
• Respect
• Sport-specific skill development
• Officiating skills
• Recall and remember contemporary issues in sport.
• Write detailed reports using knowledge of contemporary issues and media.
• Create session plans
• Reflect and evaluate the effectiveness of coaching sessions.
• Infer and apply the rules of a sport.
• Officiate
• Communication skills for practical units
• Questioning and challenging perceived or prior knowledge
• Observe and recommend improvements to others.
• Experience of taking on the role of a leader and delivering activity sessions to their peers.
• Level 1 Sports Leaders Award
Year 11• Understand the issues which affect participation in sport
• Know about the role of sport in promoting values
• Understand the importance of hosting major sporting events
• Know about the role of national governing bodies in sport
• Know-how sport is covered across the media
• Understand positive effects that the media can have on sport
• Understand negative effects that the media can have on sport
• Understand the relationship between sport and the media

Media in Sport
(RO54 – Optional Unit)
• Organisation
• Time management
• Leadership
• Communication
• Responsibility
• Confidence
• Respect

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Physical Education:

  • Students need to learn how to organise and manage their time, ensuring that they are completing assignments set and meeting deadlines.
  • Students need to develop an understanding of the different assessment command words such as describe, explain, evaluate etc, and how to answer questions on these correctly.
  • Students need to develop the ability to complete research, and present the information in their own words.  
  • Students will have to develop LORIC values to be able to confidently plan, and deliver/coach sessions to their peers
  • Students need to learn how to evaluate their own performance, recognising their strengths and areas for development
  • Students need to learn the rules of different sports, and be able to use this knowledge to officiate successfully
  • Students need to learn how to memorize and retain information, and reproduce this information in exam situations
  • Students need to develop investigative skills and be able to present their findings to an audience

In Year 9, students take part in Sport Education, where they adopt roles and responsibilities and lead their peers in activities within their PE lessons. This leads appropriately into the first unit in Year 10 – Leadership in Sport. Students complete research on the different types of leaders in sport and the qualities they need to possess to be effective. They also have the opportunity to plan a sports session of their choice, consider the safety issues, and deliver this session to their peers. They also have to evaluate their performance, identifying how they can improve. Students can build on the skills they developed in Year 9 in leading their peers.  

Year 10

Unit RO53 – Leadership in Sport, is delivered first as it builds on activities from Core PE lessons in Year 9, and the aim is to build on the development of students’ leadership skills and develop their knowledge and confidence in being able to deliver a sports session successfully and evaluate it effectively.   Students also take part in RO52 – Developing Sports Skills, in Year 10, where they have the opportunity to become highly competent in one team and one individual sport.  This will also build upon skills previously developed in KS3, particularly if it is a sport that students take part in outside of school.  Students also have the opportunity to develop their skill development during practical core PE lessons in Year 10. 

Year 11

The exam unit – RO51 – Contemporary Issues in Sport, is delivered from the start of Year 11, and students sit the exam in January, with the option to resit the exam again in June.  The knowledge covered in the exam is extensive, and it takes time to develop the skill of revising effectively and being able to answer exam-style questions.  Students often find this difficult, so completing this unit in Year 11 ensures that students have a level of competency in reading and processing information, and this will help them in their exam preparation. Students also complete Unit RO54 – Media in Sport, where they investigate the effects of the media on sport, both positive and negative.  This also builds on students ability to carry out research and an investigative study and present the information to their peers.

The course units have been carefully chosen to allow students to build on previously learnt skills from KS3 and to ensure that students gain a wide and varied experience to help them make more informed choices at the end of KS4.

  • RO53 – Leadership in Sport builds on skills developed in KS3, and it provides students with the information on what it takes to become an effective leader in sport, and they gain experience in delivering a session as a sports leader.
  • Real life examples of leaders in sport will be provided and observed, to help develop the understanding of what good/effective leaders in sport look like.
  • Practical examples and experiences will be used to help instill knowledge and understanding, e.g. carry out a ‘live’ risk assessment, ensuring that students are fully involved in drawing out and recognising the different hazards in a sports venue.
  • RO52 – Developing Sports Skills – this unit will develop their skills, techniques and use of tactics/strategies/ compositional ideas in both an individual and a team sporting activity, as well as their understanding of the rules to allow them to act in a number of officiating roles within an activity. They will also consider the use of different practice methods in order to improve their performance. The unit builds upon the core themes of the National Curriculum for Physical Education in Key Stages 3 and 4 and offers learners the opportunity to refine and showcase skills developed as part of that programme of study. 
  • RO51 – Contemporary Issues in Sport – students will explore a range of topical and contemporary issues in sport, relating to participation levels and barriers, the promotion of values and ethical behaviour through sport and the role of high-profile sporting events and national governing bodies in advancing sports’ attempts to positively impact upon society and showcase their worth beyond providing entertainment. 
  • RO54 – Media in Sport – students will develop their knowledge and understanding of the relationship between sport and the media as well as their ability to evaluate and interpret the different ways in which sports items may be represented by the media. The skills developed would be relevant in a range of careers and roles within the sports industry, such as sports reporting/broadcasting, sports analysis or research and Public Relations or media work within a sports organisation.

Food and Nutrition

Overview of the KS4 Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 10• Food commodities
• Principles of nutrition
• Diet and good health
• The science of food
• Where does food come from?
• Cooking and food preparation
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Organisation
• Communication
Practice and develop a repertoire of food-handling skills to be able to prepare and cook a wide variety of dishes both sweet and savoury.Chef, Let’s have a go session – UCB – practical food preparation skills, Food science lab experience.
Year 11CA1: The Food Investigation Assessment
CA2: The Food Preparation Assessment
Cooking and food preparation
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Organisation
• Communication
Apply skills learnt in science and food to plan, prepare and carry out an investigation into food science.
Apply principles of nutrition and food preparation to plan, prepare and cook a variety of dishes to meet a design brief.
All students have access to ingredients that may be unfamiliar to them.

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Food and Nutrition:

  • Students will be able to demonstrate effective and safe cooking skills by planning, preparing and cooking a variety of food commodities whilst using different cooking techniques and equipment
  • Students will develop knowledge and understanding of the functional properties and chemical characteristics of food as well as a sound knowledge of the nutritional content of food and drinks
  • Students will develop an understand the relationship between diet, nutrition and health, including the physiological and psychological effects of poor diet and health
  • Students will need to understand the economic, environmental, ethical and socio-cultural influences on food availability, production processes, diet and health choices
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of functional and nutritional properties, sensory qualities and microbiological food safety considerations when preparing, processing, storing, cooking and serving food
  • Students will understand and explore a range of ingredients and processes from different culinary traditions (traditional British and international) to inspire new ideas or modify existing recipes.

We start in Year 10 with work on commodities allowing students to know and learn the value of the commodity within the diet. They will identify features and characteristics of each commodity with reference to their correct storage to avoid food contamination.  Students will investigate the working characteristics of each commodity and be able to prepare and cook a dish using each one. Commodities as a topic allow students to draw upon the base level of knowledge gained about food in Key Stage 3 at the same time providing opportunities to provide links to other areas of the specifications without the need to explicitly and exclusively teach some topics.

Year 10

The order of topics within Year 10 should allow for students to continue to build their KS3 knowledge. The introduction of more complex/high-level practical skills gives them access to a whole range of dishes suitable for their controlled assessment. By continuing with commodities students will link their previous knowledge about nutrition and properties of ingredients and the value of the commodity within the diet, and be able to discuss characteristics and features of each commodity with reference to their correct storage to avoid food contamination. More focus will be given to the working characteristics of each commodity and the origins of each commodity.

Year 11

The release of the controlled assessment elements in Year 11 means that we have no choice about the timing and delivery of these elements of the course. Component 1 is released in September of the academic year and component 2 is released in January. This leaves us time after the completion of these elements for revision in preparation for the terminal examination in May/June at the end of the course.

The order of topics within year 10 should allow for students to continue to build their KS3 knowledge and practical skills. Students continue to gain and secure their knowledge of nutrition and focus more so on the working characteristics and functional properties of nutrients and apply this to the development of recipes and menu planning, Opportunities are provided with the sequence of work for students to gain a better understanding of factors affecting food choice which can spark debate and intrigue especially around current lifestyle choices e.g. veganism, Genetic modification and sustainability to name a few.

Key Stage 5

We aim to ensure that all students are taught…

OCR L3 Technical in Sport and Physical Activity

KS5 Curriculum Intent:

The course aims to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the principles of Sport and Physical Activity. Students will gain an

insight into the sector as they investigate opportunities for delivering sport and physical activity to a wide range of participants, whether it is to improve their health and wellbeing, or to help participants improve their performance in sport and fitness. In doing so, students will also gain core skills required for employment or further study in the sector such as analysis, organisation and adaptation.  They will also develop professional, personal and social skills, as well as theoretical knowledge and understanding to underpin these skills. These support the transferable skills required by universities and employers such as communication, problem-solving, time management, research and analytical skills.  The Level 3 Cambridge Technical in Sport and Physical Activity focuses on the requirements that today’s universities and employers demand, and students will practically apply their skills and knowledge in preparation for further study at University or in a sports-based workplace.

Overview of the KS5 Curriculum:

Knowledge Attributes/Character Skills Experiences
Year 12• Understand the skeletal system in relation to exercise and physical activity
• Understand the muscular system in relation to exercise and physical activity
• Understand the cardiovascular system in relation to exercise and physical activity
• Understand the respiratory system in relation to exercise and physical activity
• Understand the different energy systems in relation to exercise and physical activity
• Know the roles and responsibilities of sports coaches and activity leaders
• Understand principles that underpin coaching and leading
• Be able to use methods to improve skills, techniques and tactics in sport
• Be able to plan sports and activity sessions
• Be able to prepare sports and activity environments
• Be able to deliver sports and activity sessions
• Be able to review sports and activity sessions
• Organisation
• Time management
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Leadership
• Communication
• Ability to remember and recall factual information regarding body systems.
• Assess the impact of training on the body systems.
• Suggest and create appropriate training methods for each system.
• Research and develop skills to help plan effective coaching sessions.
• Reflect on the effectiveness of coaching sessions.
Experience in working with KS2 students and delivering sessions.
Experience in setting up and coordinating a ‘multi-skills festival’
First Aid Course
Sports Leaders Award Level 2
Year 13• Understand how sport is organised in the UK, the organisations involved, and their roles and responsibilities.
• Have an understanding of Sports Development and its purpose of it.
• Understand the different methods of delivering sport development and the advantages and disadvantages of sports development initiatives.
• Know common sports injuries and their effects.
• Be able to minimise the risk of sports injuries.
• Be able to respond to acute sports injuries when they occur.
• Know the role of different agencies in the treatment and rehabilitation of sports injuries.
• Be able to plan a rehabilitation programme for a specific sports injury.
• Empathy
• Problem Solving
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Leadership
• Organisation
• Communication
• Understanding of how sport is organised within the UK.
• Understanding of Sports Development
• Compare the successfulness of an initiative compared to its outcomes.
• Develop skills for planning, promoting and delivering a sports event.
• Experience of working independently and as part of a team.
• Establish transferable skills which can be used within sport and active leisure as well as within the fitness industry.
• Enhance skills such as teamwork, organisation and safeguarding awareness.
• How to recognise and treat common sports injuries.
• Plan short term and long term recovery through rehabilitation
• Investigate the possible psychological impacts of sports injuries.
Visits to Sports Science laboratory
Excursion to a Sporting National Governing Body office.

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through the curriculum in Physical Education:

  • Students need to learn how to memorize and retain information about anatomy and physiology of the human body and how exercise has an effect on it.
  • Students will have to develop LORIC values to be able to confidently coach sessions to external agencies.
  • Students will have to develop the ability to adapt their approaches to delivering sports sessions at short notice.
  • Students need to enhance their problem solving abilities to recognise and treat sports injuries.
  • Students need to develop investigative skills and explore Sports Development and the role of the National Governing Bodies

In year 12 students must complete two mandatory units.  These units must be completed successfully in order to progress into year 2 of the course.  

In Year 10, students complete a unit in Leadership in Sport, and this leads appropriately into the first unit in year 12 – Unit 2 Sports Coaching and Activity Leadership, where students will continue to build on their knowledge of sports leadership that they developed in Year 10.  The exam unit – Unit 1, is also delivered from the start of year 12.  The knowledge covered in the exam is extensive, and it takes time to develop the skill of revising effectively and being able to answer exam-style questions.  Students often find this difficult, they need to have a level of competency in reading and processing information, which will help them in their exam preparation. Students have 2 attempts to pass the exam.

Unit 1 – Body Systems and the effects of Physical Activity, is an exam based unit. Students will gain an understanding of the structures and functions of the key body systems, how these support and impact performance in sport and physical activity and the effects that physical activity, training and lifestyle can have on them. The majority of information in this unit is new content, but there is some crossover with GCSE Science, especially when looking at the structure and function of the heart, lungs, arteries and veins. This unit will also provide students with the foundation anatomical knowledge that they will require to study further and higher education courses in Sport. 

Unit 2 – Sports Coaching and Activity Leadership, is coursework and practical based unit.  The unit will provide students with an understanding behind the theory of what makes good sports coaches and activity leaders, and methods that can be employed to improve the performance of participants. Students will explore the roles and responsibilities of coaches and leaders and how they differ from each other and others involved in delivering and teaching sport and physical activity.  Students will develop the skills and understanding necessary to effectively plan and deliver a series of sports or activity sessions reflecting on their own practice and using feedback to improve their performance as a sports coach or activity leader. This unit is closely linked to Unit RO53 – Sport Leadership; that students have studied at Level 2, and this will provide learners with a solid foundation of knowledge in Sports Leadership to build upon at Level 3.

Year 13

Unit 17 Sports injuries will apply the majority of information learned through Unit 1 in Year 12. Students will be able to articulate and describe injuries and aetiology using correct anatomical terminology.  Unit 3 (Mandatory) and Unit 8 will build on the knowledge gained in Unit 2 in Year 12.

Unit 3 is another exam based unit looking at Sports Development. Students will have a greater understanding of the role of coaches within Sports Development because of work completed in Unit 2. Unit 8 (Organising Sports Events) will build on the experience they had set up the ‘multi-skills festival’ at the end of Unit 2 in Year 12.

The course units have been chosen to allow students to look at the different paths and qualifications in sport. Unit 1 allows students to experience knowledge needed for a Sports Science career. Unit 2 allows students to experience what it is like to coach or teach sporting activities. Unit 3 allows students to discover the role and importance of Sports Development within the UK. Unit 8 is significant, especially with the Commonwealth Games taking place in Birmingham in 2022. The unit gives them an insight into what has been done to allow the Games to come to the City and the long term effects of these types of International Events. Sports Injury (Unit 17) allows students to gain an insight into the possible medical routes in Sport, such as Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation. The new information builds on what is learned at KS3/4, which covers information on Components of Fitness and Nutrition.

BTEC Sport Date: Jun 30, 2021
Child Development Date: Jun 30, 2021