Social Science

Directors of Learning design sequences of lessons that combine with our Personal Development Programme delivered by Form Tutors. These closely align with our mission to ‘Teach What Matters’, a deliberate approach to ensure we address challenges that our students are likely to face and to give them the best possible chance of meeting their limitless potential. 

We want all Holyhead students to be able to;

  • Solve problems
  • Apply knowledge to the real world
  • Adapt to change and be resilient to failure
  • Be aware of their own thought processes and memory (metacognition)
  • Be articulate and express themselves
  • Think critically

We want all students at Holyhead to be strong in relation to the following attributes;

  • Leadership
  • Organisation
  • Resilience
  • Initiative
  • Communication

We also want them to recognise the best of human thinking and appreciate the fundamental British Values.  

Mr N Hutchins

Director of Learning

Miss D Shergill

Social Sciences & Subject Lead of Psychology

Mrs J Richards

Subject Lead of Health and Social Care

Social Sciences subjects equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to understand themselves and their interactions with the world around them. We have developed a genuinely engaging curriculum that allows students to connect with and explore the way people think and behave, their social and cultural environment and the people within it, including past, present and the future.

Social Sciences at Holyhead allow young people to understand and connect with their community in Handsworth by developing knowledge and understanding of issues that are relevant to them, allowing them to develop their moral, social and cultural understanding, promoting tolerance and respect for people from all walks of life whilst developing critical thinkers and effective problem solvers. The faculty is proud to be at the vanguard of helping students to understand how to learn effectively and be successful at Holyhead School and beyond.

In Psychology, students learn about the human mind and how and why we behave in the ways we do. In Sociology, students learn about human social relationships and how humans collectively behave in organised groups. In Health and Social Care, students are equipped with the skills and knowledge needed to care for people in a broad range of health and social care settings. In Media and Film Studies, students learn about how institutions communicate with audiences and the ways modern communication can shape the way we see the world around us. PSHE stands for Personal Social Health and Economic education and helps students to gain the skills and understanding they need to lead confident, healthy and independent lives.

PSHCE

PSHCE prepares young people for the complexities of modern life, helping them to understand and critically assess situations that they may face in the future.  This is the start of learners PSHCE journey within Holyhead. Students will have received a mixed diet before this, with some being exposed to very little PSHCE whilst others having more knowledge.   Young people are interested in issues that affect them, Handsworth’s issues include drugs, gangs, deprivation, and many more. It is our responsibility to equip young people with the knowledge and skills to help them problem solve and keep them safe, healthy and happy. We recognise that students will receive inaccurate information about many issues from peers, the internet and possibly their families. We want students to access accurate and reliable information which can be discussed and explored within a safe environment. We want them to understand the social and emotional differences between passive and aggressive behaviour, and assertive behaviour, whilst helping to build their skills in self-expression to articulate their thoughts positively and clearly.  We also want students to have confidence, to build resilience, to be active within their community and have the tools to make a positive difference, always believing in themselves and having high aspirations.  Overall PSHCE helps students to identify, empathise, discuss and apply issues to real life that affect young people within Handsworth and the global society we live in today.  Over time we want students to be able to analyse their cognitions (thinking), emotions (feelings) and behaviour (actions), enabling them to make good choices that will have a positive impact on their lives and the people around them.

Health & Social Care

In Health and Social Care, students are equipped with the skills and knowledge needed to care for people in a broad range of health and social care settings. The Health and Social Care curriculum aims to recognise the value of learning skills, knowledge and vocational attributes to complement GCSEs whilst putting theory into practice at level 3. The qualifications will broaden the students’ experience and understanding of the varied progression options available to them, preparing them to be active citizens in society in the future.

The key skills of a H&SC practitioner are:

  • Communication 
  • Teamworking 
  • Planning
  • Organisation 
  • Using initiative 
  • Leadership 
  • Ability to meet deadlines
  • Being a reflective learner 
  • Tolerance
  • Respect for others

Sociology

Sociology focuses on the ways that individuals are affected by the people around them (families, friends, the media etc) and the social groups they belong to (e.g. our ‘ethnicity’ or our ‘social class’).  The AQA Sociology specification is the most suitable for our students as the topics are relevant to issues that affect the Handsworth area. Lessons aim to offer insight and explain social patterns in contemporary society which are relevant to our students in Holyhead. For e.g, explanations for the rise in youth knife crime, explanations for differences in ethnic and gender achievement in education, why are fewer people marrying and more divorcing today? These are all issues that our students find interesting and are eager to learn more about to better understand the world around them.

The key skills of a sociologist are:

  • Up to date with current issues (politics, world news & events, mass media, the environment).
  • Prepared to challenge the views of others and have their own views challenged also. 
  • Critical thinker.
  • Uses empirical evidence to support arguments in debates.
  • Has a sense of self and is able to identify their strengths & weaknesses as a learner. 
  • Prepared to have their mind changed as they evolve over time. 

Media & Film Studies

We aim to ensure that all students are taught…

Media Studies

In Media Studies lessons we study a wide range of media products and industries to help students understand one of the most pressing issues of our time: how does the media we consume shape our opinions and actions. This helps students develop ‘media literacy’ to enable young people to have the skills, knowledge and understanding to make full use of the opportunities presented by both traditional and new communications services. Media literacy also helps people to manage content and communications, and protect themselves and their families from the potential risks associated with using these services. In an online environment where the possibility for direct content regulation diminishes, the need for a media-literate public increase. In addition, the Eduqas GCSE Media Studies course has been carefully selected to both engage students and challenge their preconceptions with a range of products they will be familiar with, such as music videos and Fortnite with but to also develop their cultural capital by exposing them to less familiar but significant media products such as The Guardian and The Archers. Furthermore, we equip students with engaging and accessible practical skills that will help them interact with the media landscape more effectively and increase their understanding of how media representations are constructed as well as develop their LORIC skills.

Film Studies

In Film Studies lessons we study a wide range of film texts, including silent cinema, seminal historical films and documentaries. The Eduqas A Level Film Studies specification has been carefully selected as it allows us to develop students’ understanding of film as an art form through familiar genres our students will find engaging (albeit often in unusual modes) but also by challenging them by studying films that they would not normally consider watching. We see film studies as crucial to developing students’ cultural capital – this may be the only time in their lives they will be challenged to understand art from previous eras and in different languages. In many ways, understanding film as an art form is the English literature of the modern age. Not only does developing an understanding of non-mainstream film in an academic way allow students to take this knowledge forward into future social and academic interactions but we value the benefits of how learning to appreciate the depth and variety of a more accessible art form may often be a gateway to explore other art forms in a similar way. As many of our students say once they study film: “ah, I get it now…I can’t just watch and enjoy a film in the same way anymore without explaining to people how it works!”

What are the key skills of a media and film studies student:

Media Studies

  • To be able to demonstrate relevant, comprehensive and in-depth knowledge and
  • understanding of a range of media language, representations, audiences, industries and associated theoretical perspectives, and a range of contexts of media and their influence on media products and processes
  • To be able to perceptively analyse media products, making substantiated judgements and evidence-based conclusions
  • To be able to use a range of subject specific terminology accurately
  • To be able to create effective media products which deliberately communicate meaning for intended audiences, by applying thorough knowledge and understanding of media language and representation

Film Studies

  • To be able to demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and sophisticated understanding of elements of film including:
    • film form and aesthetics
    • messages and representations
    • film contexts
    • narrative
  • To be understand and be able to apply a range of specialist areas to specific films and genres
    • spectatorship
    • film-makers’ ideologies
    • auteurship
    • documentary styles
    • expressionism and realism
    • short films
    • the impact of digital technology on films
  • To be able to apply knowledge and understanding of elements of film to:
    • produce highly relevant, confident and complex analysis of films using subject terminology fluently and precisely
    • analyse and compare films in a lively, complex and thorough manner, identifying a range of highly appropriate points
    • demonstrate sophisticated, accurate and confident use of critical approaches to analyse and compare films in responses that are highly relevant, perceptive and very well-reasoned
  • To be able to apply the understanding of film form and demonstrate comprehensive knowledge and sophisticated understanding of elements of film in the production and evaluation of a film or screenplay.

PSHCE Key Stage 3

  1. Self-improvement (including through constructive self-reflection, seeking and utilising constructive feedback and effective goal-setting) 
  2. Identifying unhelpful ‘thinking traps’ (e.g. generalisation and stereotyping) 
  3. Recognising and managing peer influence and the need for peer approval, including evaluating perceived social norms 
  4. Strategies for identifying and accessing appropriate help and support 
  5. Clarifying own values (including reflection on the origins of personal values and beliefs) and re-evaluating values and beliefs in the light of new learning, experiences and evidence 
  6. Empathy and compassion (including impact on decision-making and behaviour) 
  7. Respect for others’ right to their own beliefs, values and opinions 
  8. Discernment in evaluating the arguments and opinions of others (including challenging ‘group think’)
  9. Recognising, evaluating and utilising strategies for managing influence 
  10. Valuing and respecting diversity 
  11. Using these skills and attributes to build and maintain healthy relationships of all kinds
  12. Identification, assessment (including prediction) and management of positive and negative risk to self and others 
  13. Formulating questions (as part of an enquiring approach to learning and to assess the value of information) 
  14. Analysis (including separating fact and reasoned argument from rumour, speculation and opinion) 
  15. Assessing the validity and reliability of the information 
  16. Identify links between values and beliefs, decisions and actions 

Throughout the KS3 curriculum, students are building knowledge incrementally which means that content is regularly revisited and interleaved amongst most aspects of the schemes eg Do Now – students are repeatedly having to draw upon long term schemas to support learning current knowledge. 

Teachers of PSHCE are Social Science and PE teachers, most of whom have taught PSHCE for one or more years.

Many of the lessons have guidance documents attached to them so teachers have the knowledge, understanding of the resources and how they should be effectively delivered.

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through PSHCE:

Overall there is a constant theme of healthy relationships between people encouraging respect and equality/equity that is developed through exploring issues such as hidden societal values, conflict, bullying, rights and differences between people. This is then built upon as students grow older.  In Year 7 students are exposed to the basic themes of the protected characteristics of the Equality Act which are then built upon in Y8 through learning about the democratic process and then in more detail in Y9 where equality/ equity issues are studied in more detail. The following processes will be followed within schemes of work: firstly concepts are introduced and understood, then activities are undertaken which help students look at the issue from different perspectives. Students are then given information about where to get help. Finally, an assessment activity shows the student and the teacher what they have learned. This format may occur within one lesson or across a series of lessons within a half term.

Overview of the KS3 Curriculum:

KnowledgeAttributes/CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 7• Bullying
• Diversity and equality
• Understanding citizenship
• Drugs and risk
• Health and self esteem
• Understanding local democracy
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Communication
• Empathy
• Assessing information and then recognising and managing risk.
• Identify links between values and beliefs, decisions and actions.
• Respect for others’ right to their own beliefs, values and opinions / Valuing and respecting diversity.
• Self-improvement.
• Empathy and compassion (including impact on decision-making and behaviour)
Real-life dilemmas/ issues used to support recognising and managing risk via scenarios/video clips.
Year 8• Mental health
• Crime (including knife crime)
• Healthy relationships
• How to stay safe and healthy whilst reducing risk
• Parliament, government and voting
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Communication
• Empathy
• Assessing information and then recognising and managing risk.
• Identify links between values and beliefs, decisions and actions.
• Respect for others’ right to their own beliefs, values and opinions
• Self-improvement.
• Empathy and compassion (including impact on decision-making and behaviour)
Real-life dilemmas/ issues used to support recognising and managing risk via scenarios/video clips.
Year 9• Equity, race and the law
• Healthy relationships
• How to stay safe and healthy whilst reducing risk
• Drugs, alcohol and gambling
• Strengths and weaknesses of the legal system
• Extremism and terrorism
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Communication
• Empathy
• Assessing information and then recognising and managing risk.
• Identify links between values and beliefs, decisions and actions.
• Respect for others’ right to their own beliefs, values and opinions / Valuing and respecting diversity.
• Self-improvement.
• Empathy and compassion (including impact on decision-making and behaviour)
Real-life dilemmas/ issues used to support recognising and managing risk via scenarios/video clips.

Students arrive at Holyhead with differing experiences, knowledge and understanding of PSHCE issues. The newly introduced statutory PSHE curriculum should start to provide consistent provision at Primary school. The aim of the Y7 SoL is to give all students a good foundation in healthy and unhealthy relationships (including bullying and equality issues), an understanding of themselves and their values, and an introduction/grounding in citizenship issues and democracy.  The  KS3 curriculum hopes to develop and deepen this level of understanding as well as build knowledge for those with a more restrictive PSHCE offer at KS2.

Year 7

There is a focus on relationships, giving students an opportunity to discuss issues related to bullying, abuse, and wider issues such as diversity and asylum.  This reflection instils empathy and a greater understanding of healthy relationships and values as opposed to unhealthy relationships and values.  Students also learn about the risks associated with drugs such as caffeine (energy drinks), smoking and alcohol, where they are asked to practice their assertion skills developed in the bullying topic.  An introduction/grounding in citizenship issues and democracy is also taught.

Year 8

Within Year 8 the focus on relationships is deepened by focusing on specific challenges and risks faced within society such as gender stereotyping, domestic abuse, sexting, sexual exploitation etc. Mental health and wellbeing helps to equip students with strategies as school work and pressures will start to increase. Knowledge and understanding of citizenship issues are built upon through topics such as crime and its impact and parliament, government and voting.

Year 9

By Year 9 students will have matured and their skills and understanding developed enough to start looking at big concepts in more detail eg equity/social justice, racism and colourism, extremism and terrorism.  The focus on relationships and values (repeated with each year group) is deepened by focusing on specific challenges and risks faced within society such as domestic violence and the dangers of pornography. The drugs topic started in Y7 is built upon by focusing on illegal drugs such as cannabis, laws, and strategies to manage risk and influences. Knowledge and understanding of citizenship issues are built upon by focusing on the strengths and weaknesses of the UK legal system.

PSHE Key Stage 4

Overview of the KS4 Curriculum:

KnowledgeAttributes/CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 10• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Communication
• Empathy
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Communication
• Empathy
• Assessing information and then recognising and managing risk.
• Identify links between values and beliefs, decisions and actions.
• Respect for others’ right to their own beliefs, values and opinions / Valuing and respecting diversity.
• Self-improvement.
• Empathy and compassion (including impact on decision-making and behaviour)
Real-life dilemmas/ issues used to support recognising and managing risk via scenarios/video clips.

Year 10

Mental health and wellbeing help to equip students with positive strategies for well being as school work and pressures will start to increase with the start of GCSE content. The focus on relationships and values (repeated with each year group) is deepened by focusing on Relationships and Sex Education,  e.g. family life and fertility and pregnancy. The drugs topic started in Y7, and developed further in Y9 is built upon by focusing on risks of substance use when travelling or socialising, strategies for managing peer influence in increasingly independent contexts and evaluating ways to be a positive influence on peers in relation to substance use. Knowledge and understanding of citizenship issues are built upon through focusing on the strengths and weaknesses of democracy and how the UK is changing in relation to diversity, assessing the reliability of the information on the internet.

What key steps will be taken to ensure that students gain a broad and balanced knowledge within Religious Studies?

  • Throughout the PSHCE curriculum students are building knowledge incrementally which means that content is regularly revisited and interleaved amongst most aspects of the schemes eg Do Now – students are repeatedly having to draw upon long term schemas to support learning current knowledge. 
  • Teachers of PSHCE are Social Science and PE teachers, most of whom have taught PSHCE for one or more years.
  • Many of the lessons have guidance documents attached to them so teachers have knowledge, understanding of the resources and how they should be effectively delivered.

Health & Social Care KS4

KS4 Curriculum Intent:

Health and Social Care BTEC Level 2  gives learners the opportunity to develop sector-specific knowledge and skills in a practical learning environment. The main focus is on four areas of equal importance, which cover the:

  • Development of key skills that prove your aptitude in health and social care such as interpreting data to assess an individual’s health 
  • Process that underpins effective ways of working in health and social care, such as designing a plan to improve an individual’s health and wellbeing 
  • Attitudes that are considered most important in health and social care, including the care values that are vitally important in the sector, and the opportunity to practise applying them
  • Knowledge that underpins effective use of skills, process and attitudes in the sector such as human growth and development, health and social care services, and factors affecting people’s health and wellbeing.

Overview of the KS4 Curriculum:

KnowledgeAttributes/CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 10• Human Lifespan Development
• Health and Social Care Services and Values
• Communication
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Respect
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Describe growth and development across three life stages for a selected individual
• Explain and compare how different factors have affected growth
and development of a
selected individual
• Explain and compare the impact of a life event on the development of two individuals
• Explain and compare how two individuals adapted to a life event, using support
• Explain how health and social care services meet the needs of individuals in a given scenario
• Explain how barriers could affect the use of one health or social care service for an individual in a given scenario
• Interviews with family members
• Watch The Secret Life of a 5 year old
• Watch Old People’s Home for 4 year olds
Year 11• Health and Social Care Services and Values
• Health and Wellbeing
• Communication
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Respect
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Demonstrate the care values independently in a health or social care context
• Describe positive and negative aspects of own demonstration of the care values making justified and appropriate recommendations for improvements of own application of the care values that incorporate feedback
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of factors that affect health and wellbeing
• Interpret health indicators
• Design a person-centred health and wellbeing improvement plan
• Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how to overcome obstacles relating to health and wellbeing improvement plans
• Use of physiological equipment to help interpret health indicators
• Watch a nine to five with Stacey Dooley- Caring & Sharing

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through Health & Social Care:

  • Physical, Intellectual, Emotional, Social development 
  • Life events 
  • The different types of H&SC available to different people
  • The external component (Health and wellbeing) builds on knowledge, understanding and skills acquired and developed in Components 1 (Human Lifespan development) and 2 (H&SC Services and Values). Students will be given a case study and will assess an individual’s health and wellbeing, drawing on their understanding of life events from Component 1. They will design a health and wellbeing improvement plan that draws on their knowledge of services and care values from Component 2.

Started with Component 1 Human Lifespan development as this is the foundation of knowledge that is required. Everything else students learn will build up from this. 

Year 10

Year 10 consists of 2 components:

  • Component 1 foundation knowledge based on PIES development and life events.
  • Component 2 builds on component 1 understanding what different people need from H&SC services. We will look at Learning Aim A Understand the different types of health and social care services and barriers to accessing them

Year 11

We will begin with Component 3 Health and Wellbeing to give students an opportunity to sit the exam in January with the potential to re-sit in May if required. Then we will go back to Component 2 Learning Aim B Demonstrate care values and review our own practice building on what has already been taught in Year 10. 

The steps to ensure students gain a broad and balanced knowledge:

  • Use of real life case studies 
  • Relevant real life scenarios linked to society 
  • Explanation of how to use the verbs for coursework

AQA GCSE Sociology KS4

Overview of the KS4 Curriculum:

KnowledgeAttributes/CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 10Research Methods Families • SMSC
• Respect
• Communication
• Describe and explain each research method
• Analyse the strengths and weaknesses of both qualitative and quantitative methods
• Describe and explain different family types
• Create reasoned balanced arguments using sociological theories
• Critical evaluation of each theory
• Real life studies used to support theories.
Year 11Education
Crime & Deviance
Social Stratification
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Empathy
• Describe & explain different perspectives of education and crime
• Be able to compare theoretical views
• Be able to use official statistics to support arguments in essays
• Critical evaluation of each theory
• To be able to make Synoptic links between past units
• Real life studies used to support theories.

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through Sociology are:

  • Students need to have an understanding of how norms and values inform cultural identities, beliefs and behaviours. 
  • Students need to have an understanding of the key sociological perspectives (Functionalism, Marxism, Feminism, Postmodernism)
  • Students need to have an understanding of each social institution and the role they play in spreading the norms and values of society. 
  • Students need to understand how to build a balanced argument – this then leads to the ability to evaluate and make judgements. 

Year 10

Research Methods are taught at the beginning of Year 10. This has been done to ensure the students have a basic knowledge of Research Methods for when they begin the Families unit where there will be ‘methods in context’ questions.  These questions will ask them to identify strengths and limitations of a particular research method when studying topics in Families. 

Once Research Methods is done we will move on to Families as I tend to find this topic is more relatable for students to grasp, lending itself better to being covered in Year 10. They all have families and are able to relate and reflect on their own experiences. I find that the theories of the family are also less complex than the other theories so it is a good starting point for them to build their theoretical knowledge.  The main skills taught at the start of this year are AO1 and AO2 skills. Students are learning the knowledge and then applying it to questions, providing examples of their own. As we progress AO3 skills will start to develop.

Year 11

Students may have already started the Education unit at the end of Year 10. This all depends on time constraints. If not, they will begin the Education unit which will require them to use the same skills as the unit before. They will have methods in context questions and they will also have more 12 mark essay questions to contend with. Students will now be building on the AO1 & AO2 and working on mastering AO3 skills. Students need to be able to compare and contrast theoretical perspectives and evaluate by identifying strong and weak arguments. 

The steps to ensure students gain a broad and balanced knowledge:

  • Throughout the KS4 curriculum students’ knowledge is being cemented as regular recap and retrieval is done at the start of each topic and term. Quizzes and whiteboards are embedded in the SOL. 
  • Students are exposed to a range of views (political and sociological), this in turn gives them a balanced and broad understanding of what they are learning. 
  • Students are encouraged to read around the subject – Sociology Review magazine has been purchased on behalf of them, newspaper articles are posted regularly to the google classroom. 

KS4 Eduqas GCSE Media Studies 

Overview of the KS4 Curriculum:

KnowledgeAttributes/CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 10• Media Language (ML)
• Media Representations (R)
• Media Contexts (C)
• Media Audiences (A)
• Media Industries (I)
• Theoretical Perspectives
• Set products from:
• Advertising (MLRC)
• Magazines (MLRC)
• Film promotion (MLRCIA)
• Video games (AI)
• Radio (AI)
• Music promotion (MLRCIA)
• Leadership
• Organisation
• Resilience
• Initiative
• Communication
• Working with others
• Discussing issues sensitively
• Respect for different groups
• Critical thinking
• Enquiry
• Analysis
• Making judgments
• Evaluating using evidence
• Using terminology accurately
• Develop theoretical understanding
• Writing for specific audiences and purposes
• Media productions skills (photography, video, design)
• Research
• Planning
• Organisation
• Creativity
• Communicating to specific audiences
• Opportunities to learn and develop media production skills from media professionals
• Opportunities to learn and develop media production skills using technology
• Visits to local and national media organisations
• Outside speakers from the media industry
• Access to media products that broaden cultural capital
Year 11• Media Language (ML)
• Media Representations (R)
• Media Contexts (C)
• Media Audiences (A)
• Media Industries (I)
• Theoretical Perspectives
• Set products from:
• Video games (AI)
• Radio (AI)
• Newspapers (MLRCIA)
• Music promotion (MLRCIA)
• TV Crime Drama (MLRCIA)
• Leadership
• Organisation
• Resilience
• Initiative
• Communication
• Working with others
• Discussing issues sensitively
• Respect for different groups
• Critical thinking
• Enquiry
• Analysis
• Making judgments
• Evaluating using evidence
• Using terminology accurately
• Develop theoretical understanding
• Writing for specific audiences and purposes
• Media productions skills (photography, video, design)
• Research
• Planning
• Organisation
• Creativity
• Communicating to specific audiences
• Opportunities to learn and develop media production skills from media professionals
• Opportunities to learn and develop media production skills using technology
• Visits to local and national media organisations
• Outside speakers from the media industry
• Access to media products that broaden cultural capital

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through Sociology are:

This GCSE Media Studies specification is based on the theoretical framework for exploring and creating media. The framework is based on four inter-related areas:

  • media language: how the media through their forms, codes and conventions communicate meanings
  • representation: how the media portray events, issues, individuals and social groups
  • media industries: how the media industries’ processes of production, distribution and circulation affect media forms and platforms
  • audiences: how media forms target, reach and address audiences, how audiences interpret and respond to them, and how members of audiences become producers themselves.


The framework provides a holistic and focused approach to interpreting and analysing the media, which learners will develop progressively as they study the course. Students then develop, through guided practice, the skills to think critically and analyse media products by applying these skills to a range of set products from a wide range of media forms.

Students complete introductory study on all four areas of the theoretical framework that are the cornerstones of media analysis and understanding. This begins with developing a firm grasp of media terminology for media language – this links to prior learning as students are likely to be familiar with some more basic elements of terminology (such as ‘close up’) from everyday life and primary and KS3 learning.

Year 10

An introductory study of the four areas of the theoretical framework begins with developing a firm grasp of media terminology for media language as the starting point for media analysis and critical thinking but also because it is more accessible than areas of the framework, such as media industries.

This is followed by applying the theoretical framework to examination set products in advertising, film promotion and magazines as these are the most straightforward media products we study and both introduce the concept of applying context to media analysis. In addition, with the study of film promotion, we can apply and develop an understanding of media audiences and industries using a reasonably familiar set media product.

The study of a more complex, subtle and synoptic range of set music promotion products commences in the third term. Production coursework is introduced towards the end of year 10 so students can independently apply to learn from the theoretical framework to create work based on following the conventions of certain media products and have had the experience of studying media types that link with examination briefs. Furthermore, this allows students to use more flexible time in the summer (daylight, holidays etc.) to take photos and videos for production work.

Year 11

Media production coursework is completed in the first term of year 11 to build upon and review the research and planning done at the end of year 11 but also to maximise the quality through more mature outcomes that are likely to be produced at this stage of the course.

In addition, students learn about media industries such as speech radio and newspapers that are likely to be less familiar to them. The rationale being that, by this stage, students have developed confidence in media critical thinking that they can apply more easily. Furthermore, the study of newspapers and TV Crime Drama in year 11 are much more synoptic in their breadth of study, allowing students to make links between everything they have learned. The year ends with a study of TV Crime Drama because students are required to use specific note-taking and examination techniques for this topic that can be intensively practiced at this point and freshly applied in the examination.

The key steps to ensure students gain a broad and balanced knowledge:

  • Students complete study on a broad and balanced range of media products, both familiar and less familiar, both contemporary and historical
  • Learning is incremental and key theoretical concepts are repeatedly applied to a range of different media products, allowing fluency of critical thinking and analysis by the end of the course
  • Interleaving (constantly returning to prior learning throughout the course) is fundamental to the way we teach media studies, with retrieval practice activities at the start of lessons to challenge students to recall past information and to build long term retention of knowledge

There is a mix of academic, practical and creative learning to allow learners to thrive regardless of their learning style.

Eduqas GCE Film Studies

Overview of the KS4 Curriculum:

KnowledgeAttributes/CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 12• Film Form and Aesthetics
• Meaning and response
• Film contexts
• Narrative
• Ideology
• Auteur
• Critical debates
• Leadership
• Organisation
• Resilience
• Initiative
• Communication
• Working with others
• Critical thinking
• Enquiry
• Analysis
• Making judgments and comparisons
• Evaluating using evidence
• Using terminology accurately
• Develop theoretical understanding
• Writing for specific audiences and purposes
• Film productions skills (screenwriting, storyboarding, filming, editing)
• Research
• Planning
• Organisation
• Creativity
• Opportunities to learn and develop film production skills from media professionals
• Opportunities to learn and develop film production skills using technology
• Visits to local and national film organisations
• Outside speakers from the film industry
• Access to film products that broaden cultural capital
Year 13• Film Form and Aesthetics
• Meaning and response
• Film contexts
• Narrative
• Ideology
• Auteur
• Critical debates
• Filmmakers’ theories
• Spectatorship
• Leadership
• Organisation
• Resilience
• Initiative
• Communication
• Working with others
• Critical thinking
• Enquiry
• Analysis
• Making judgments and comparisons
• Evaluating using evidence
• Using terminology accurately
• Develop theoretical understanding
• Writing for specific audiences and purposes
• Film productions skills (screenwriting, storyboarding, filming, editing)
• Research
• Planning
• Organisation
• Creativity
• Opportunities to learn and develop film production skills from media professionals
• Opportunities to learn and develop film production skills using technology
• Visits to local and national film organisations
• Outside speakers from the film industry
• Access to film products that broaden cultural capital

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through Sociology are:

Students need to be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of elements of film in written responses to the range of set films. 

Students need to be able to apply knowledge and understanding of elements of film to: analyse and compare films, including through the use of critical approaches; evaluate the significance of critical approaches; and analyse and evaluate own work in relation to other professionally produced work.  Finally, students need to be able to apply knowledge and understanding of elements of film to the production of a film or screenplay.

Students start year 12 with an 8 lesson transition unit that is delivered both in transition lessons and is fully resources on Google Classroom for students to complete in the first 3 weeks. The transition unit has specific lessons on all of the elements of film form and analysis to build knowledge and confidence in these skills, particularly bridging the gap between students who have previously studied film or media and to extend the learning of those that have. This is aimed at allowing students to independently use these crucial skills from the start of the course.

Year 12

After the completion of transition learning on set, films commences with the study of Casablanca to help students understand more simple ‘Classical Hollywood’ filmmaking which is the cornerstone of film analysis and of Pan’s Labyrinth which, despite being a foreign language film, is probably the most accessible and ‘obvious’ film in terms of film form, allowing students to develop confidence with critical thinking and film analysis.

During the rest of year 12, students compare the ‘Classical Hollywood’ filmmaking of Casablanca to the ‘New Hollywood’ filmmaking of Bonnie and Clyde. This helps students understand how films studied later in the course build upon more experimental and flexible styles of filmmaking.

Following this, we study the silent movie Sunrise which is fairly straightforward but also introduces the important concepts of ‘realism’ and ‘expressionism’ in film, as well as Pulp Fiction, which marks another historical landmark in movie making style in an accessible way, building on prior learning from Bonnie and Clyde on experimentation in film. The films We Need to Talk About Kevin and Amy are studied towards the end of year 12 to introduce specialist concept areas of film that are more complex.

In addition, during the second half of year 12, students learn about screenwriting techniques and apply these by completing a coursework task to write a 5-minute short film. This is built upon in the final few weeks of the year where we take advantage of the opportunities of the summer (weather, daylight, holidays, flexibility post-exams) to ask students to complete another piece of coursework – a photo storyboard of their screenplay.

Year 13

In year 13 students move in a sequence through a more complex and subtle range of films from which they can make links with films studied in year 12, creating a narrative of how older films studied in the previous years influenced the films studied this year. Films studied include City of God, Trainspotting, No Country for Old Men and Boyhood.

In addition, specific interleaving weeks (where we return to and revise a film studied in year 12) are spread throughout the year to develop understanding and make links. Furthermore, students review coursework completed in year 13 and have the opportunity to video and edit to turn their screenplay and storyboard into a short film to develop and stretch learning and maximise outcomes. Once short films are completed, students evaluate these in a written piece linking them to some research done in year 12.

The key steps to ensure students gain a broad and balanced knowledge:

A broad range of films has been chosen for study to ensure that students that complete the course have a good understanding of the impact of the historical development of film as an art form. The range of films chosen is a mix of genres and topics that will engage students in our local community but also take them out of their comfort zones and develop their cultural capital.

Interleaving weeks (where we return to and revise a film studied in year 12) are fundamental in the structure of the course, taking place in year 13. The aim of these is to develop understanding and improve memory retention for the final examination. In addition, retrieval practice tasks, low stakes quizzes, and asking students about prior and current learning are embedded into the way we teach all lessons.

KS5 AQA A-level Psychology

AQA Psychology aims to provide students with the fundamentals of the subject i.e. approaches and methods related to the core areas of Psychology – cognitive, social, biological, developmental, individual differences and research methods. It helps students develop skills valued by Higher Education (HE) and employers, including critical analysis, independent thinking and research.   The subject helps students gain an insight into themselves and their future. For example, the topic Attachments helps students understand the importance of providing sensitive parenting. Memory helps students understand how to use and gain the most from their memory and Psychopathology provides students with strategies on how to overcome and maintain mental wellbeing issues.

Overview of the KS5 Curriculum:

KnowledgeAttributes/CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 12• Attachments
• Social influence
• Psychopathology
• Approaches
• Biopsychology

Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of psychological concepts, theories, research studies, research methods and ethical issues in relation to the above topics.
They will apply psychological knowledge and understanding of the content in a range of contexts.
They will also need to analyse, interpret and evaluate psychological concepts, theories, research studies and research methods in relation to these topics, and evaluate therapies and treatments including in terms of their appropriateness and effectiveness.
Topics:
• Research methods
• Memory
• SMSC
• Resilience
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Organisation
• Communication
• Empathy
Knowledge and understanding of research methods, practical research skills and mathematical skills will be assessed. These skills should be developed through study of the specification content and through ethical practical research activities, involving:

• designing research
• conducting research
• analysing and interpreting data.
Videos help students see how psychological research takes place and they hear directly from many famous researchers. For example they view a therapist use systematic desensitisation with a client to eliminate a phobia. They also see Milgram and Zimbardo describe their research.
Year 13Topics:
• Issues and Debates
• Aggression
• Relationships
• Schizophrenia

Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of psychological concepts, theories, research studies, research methods and ethical issues in relation to the above topics, and apply psychological knowledge and understanding of these topics in a range of contexts.
They will also need to analyse, interpret and evaluate psychological concepts, theories, research studies and research methods in relation to the topics and evaluate therapies and treatments including in terms of their appropriateness and effectiveness.
• SMSC
• Resilience
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Organisation
• Communication
• Empathy
Knowledge and understanding of research methods, practical research skills and mathematical skills will be assessed. These skills should be developed through study of the specification content and through ethical practical research activities, involving:

• designing research
• conducting research
• analysing and interpreting data.
Videos bring to life what can seem like a purely academic subject. They help students see the real-life applications. For example, students will view family therapy taking place with a schizophrenic patient.

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through PSHCE:

  • Students need to be able to demonstrate their understanding through application of real life examples and psychological studies. 
  • They also need to be able to analyse and evaluate the different views and psychological perspectives they come across throughout the course. Psychology is not taught at GCSE, therefore research methods are taught first to give students a good insight into how psychological research is undertaken.

Psychology is not taught at GCSE, therefore research methods are taught first to give students a good insight into how psychological research is undertaken.

Year 12

Research methods are taught near the beginning of Year 12. This has been done to ensure the students understand how psychological research is carried out and therefore can evaluate research studies throughout the course. 

Memory is taught in tandem with research methods a few weeks into the course to assist students with understanding how their memory works. With this understanding of cognitive science students have a better understanding of effective revision techniques which they use throughout the year. 

Whilst memory provides students with an opportunity to better understand many different studies, attachment introduces students to theories. This is further built upon in the topics of Social Influence and Psychopathology. 

By the time students start the topic on Approaches, they have a good understanding of each approach and therefore, what would be a rather abstract topic, is made much more concrete as they already will have learnt much of the content. 

Biopsychology is taught towards the end of the year as much of the content is designed for Year 2 of the course.

Year 13

The issues and debates (ID’s) topic give students a wider understanding of the discussions and issues which affect the practice of psychology. Issues and debates are studied at the start of Year 13 as they have gathered enough knowledge and understanding of psychological research in Year 12 to use debates such as nature or nurture, holism or reductionism, etc within their work.  

Aggression and Relationships are topics that students find both engaging and interesting and they can apply their Issues and Debates knowledge within their evaluation. Schizophrenia is taught at the end of the year as it is a more challenging topic, with the view that students will have developed the contextual knowledge and intellectual maturity to cope better with the demands of the topic.

The key steps to ensure students gain a broad and balanced knowledge:

  • Students use a range of sources eg two text books, are encouraged to read widely as they are directed to three websites.
  • Research methods are taught and assessed throughout the course and within the three exam papers.
  • The course is taught by two teachers who meet weekly to ensure a consistent approach.

KS5 CACHE Health & Social Care

KS5 Curriculum Intent:

Studying CACHE H&SC Level 3 The Extended Diploma at Holyhead has been designed to support progression to a range of job roles within the health and social care sector. The high level of knowledge and skills required to achieve this qualification enables students to progress to Higher Education within health and social care or a related field of study, as well as further learning at Level 4 and above. UCAS points have been allocated to the Extended Diploma. Students will learn a wide range of topics ranging from Equality and Diversity to Professional Development in H&SC. The topics allow students to gain many skills such as respect, tolerance and the ability to be a reflective learner. 

Overview of the KS5 Curriculum:

KnowledgeAttributes/CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 12• Equality, diversity and rights in health and social care
• Human growth and development
• Safeguarding in health and social care
• Communication in health and social care
• Infection prevention and control in health and social care
• Psychological perspectives in health and social care
• Sociological perspectives in health and social care
• Working in H&SC
• Reflective practice
• Communication
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Respect
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Leadership
• The following are the key verbs/ skills that are used throughout the different units:
• Identify
• Describe
• Explain
• Evaluate
• Analyse
• Compare and contrast
• Work experience (75 hours minimum)
• Guest speaker – Infection Prevention & Control
Year 13• Empowerment in health and social care
• Protection of children, young people and adults in health and social care
• Anatomy and physiology for health and social care
• Research skills for health and social care
• Personal and professional development.
• Learning Disability
• Nutrition for H&SC
• The role of Play for children and young people in H&SC
• End of Life care
• Communication
• Organisation
• Initiative
• Respect
• Responsibility
• Resilience
• Leadership
• The following are the key verbs/ skills that are used throughout the different units:
• Identify
• Describe
• Explain
• Evaluate
• Critically Evaluate
• Analyse
• Compare and contrast
• Work experience (75 hours minimum)
• Guest speaker – Infection Prevention & Control
• Work experience (100 hours minimum)
• H&SC Masterclasses

Everything we do in H&SC refers back to the fundamental principles and concepts below: 

  • Equality, Discrimination, Inclusion and Rights
  • Safeguarding in H&SC 
  • Legislation linked to H&SC 
  • Policies & procedures linked to H&SC 
  • Communication in H&SC 

In Year 12 we start with Equality, Discrimination, Inclusion and Rights and Safeguarding in H&SC as all future information that we teach/ learn is linked to these units. 

If students have studied H&SC in KS4 it builds upon component 2 (Understand the different types of health and social care services and barriers to accessing them). It also builds upon prior knowledge from component 1 (Human Lifespan development).

Year 12

We start teaching Equality, diversity and rights in health and social care and Safeguarding in health and social care, these units are the foundation and are mandatory units. All the units that follow are linked to these units that we teach first. We then move onto  Human growth and development and Communication in H&SC, these units are also mandatory units linked to prior knowledge and future units. 

Year 13

We begin with DM5 Personal and professional development as it builds on Reflective practice which they learn last in Year 12 and it allows students to set goals and implement action enabling them to be reflective learners throughout Year 13. 

We also begin with Learning Disability in H&SC as it builds upon prior knowledge linked to Equality, Diversity, Inclusion and Communication. Anatomy and Physiology is taught at the beginning of Year 13 as the students will need the knowledge for the exam in January. 

The steps to ensure students gain a broad and balanced knowledge:

  • Use of real-life case studies 
  • Relevant links made to society 
  • Explanation of how to use the verbs for coursework
  • Explanation of how to reference and use quotations
  • Explanation of skills needed to paraphrase for coursework

Units taught first are those which would build on previous knowledge 

KS5 AQA GCE Sociology

Overview of the KS5 Curriculum:

KnowledgeAttributes/CharacterSkillsExperiences
Year 12Families & Households
Research Methods
Education
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Communication
• Explore and evaluate sociological beliefs
• Application of real-life to theory (official statistics, studies, real-life examples)
• Essay technique for the different exam questions
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Communication
• Essay writing course
• Taster Sessions at various Universities (BCU & Newman).
Year 13Theory & Methods
Crime & Deviance
Mass Media
• SMSC
• Responsibility
• Respect
• Communication
• Explore and evaluate sociological beliefs
• Application of real-life to theory (official statistics, studies, real-life examples)
• Essay technique for the different exam questions
• A-Level Criminology conference with CrimiKnowledge.

The fundamental principles and concepts that students need to acquire in order to progress successfully through Sociology:

  • Students need to grasp sociological ideas and concepts relating to each unit. 
  • Students need to have strong knowledge on the different research studies which have taken place within the specific units
  • Students also need to be able to identify strengths and limitations of these studies. 
  • Students need to demonstrate that they can clarify arguments from sources and analyse information provided to them in order to answer questions effectively. 
  • Students should be able to assess and evaluate arguments and ideas verbally as well as in essay questions. 

Year 12 starts off with Theories of Sociology. This is to give the students a basic understanding of what each theory thinks in general and to explain their reasoning for why they believe the things that they do. Once that is done, we will then begin to look at theories of the family in particular. At this point students already have a basic grasp of what each theory entails so it becomes easier for them to engage with the family topic. Flipped Learning booklets are also set for HW in order for students to be prepared for the lesson ahead of time.

Year 12

Research Methods are taught near the beginning of Year 12 despite there not being any explicit questions on r/methods in the Families & Households unit. This has been done to ensure the students can evaluate the methods used by thinkers in their 10 and 20 mark Families & Household essays. It also gives them the basic knowledge of r/methods they need for the second unit ‘Education’ where they will be asked to apply research methods to a topic in Education (methods in context). Education is taught in a similar format to Families & Households – however, there are fewer booklets and students are encouraged to organise their own notes. 

Year 13

Once students come back in June we hit the ground running with Theory & Methods – this topic can be quite dry so I try and get it out the way before they officially start Year 13. The aim is to get the majority of it completed before September. We start off with Sociology & Science – due to the fact that this is the most challenging topic I provide students with booklets for every topic within this unit. It is imperative that work doesn’t go missing as the concepts are very complex and the focus should be on learning and understanding. The booklets enable them to organise themselves better and focus on what I say rather than scribbling down notes everywhere. 

In September we move on to Crime & Deviance which students tend to enjoy – it’s an engaging way to start the new year as students tend to enjoy discussing theories and ideas regarding criminality from the get-go. After Crime and Deviance is the final topic – Mass Media: This is left until last as it’s the smallest topic enabling flexibility in timing, whilst also being culturally relevant to the students. 

The steps to ensure students gain a broad and balanced knowledge:

Although Families & Households are separate units – knowledge from each of them is relevant to the other, which students become aware of at the end of Year 12. They begin to recognise that a study or example they have learnt in the family unit can also be used in an Education essay also. Sociology becomes one fluid subject rather than them seeing each unit as a static topic. 

Theory & Methods is a synoptic unit – so everything the students have learnt prior to the units from Year 12 is necessary and relevant. Students are given guidance on how to tie in previous learning to what we are going through in this new unit. Constant retrieval practice is also used (whiteboards mainly). 

WJEC GCSE Media Studies Date: Jun 30, 2021
GCSE Sociology Date: Jun 30, 2021